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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I ran across someone's sale post stating that the 1zz doesn't rebuild very well. It's not something I've looked into and the search feature on here is not great.

Long story short, I've got a Spyder that's had the engine out entirely too many times. I bought it with 98k, at some point around 120 I found out it had been rebuilt with oversized bearings. The engine was burning 1 quart in 300-500 miles and I had an engine that had been rebuilt so I swapped that in.

That engines oil pump failed in 871 miles, taking the crank and a rod with it (it's rebuild-able with a different crank/rod). It didn't burn oil though.

Found a 118k Corolla that was rusty for cheap and installed that engine into my car. It "only" burns about 1 quart every 120-150 miles.

So now I've been looking for engines or debating on taking the crank/rod from this engine and fixing the rebuilt engine, or taking the pistons from the rebuilt engine, or rolling the dice on an 87k mile Corolla engine (it's newer, like 05 or 06) for $700, or totalling the car (just kidding).

Anyways, then I read that about rebuilding engines not being a great idea so now I would like to know what the consensus is. I don't mind buying the Corolla motor, but I'm still talking a chance (although, I think less of a chance of failure with the newer one).

I don't feel like swapping in a 2zz as I intend to sell this car sooner than later, I just wanted it to be a solid car before I sold it.

Tldr;

Can I rebuild a 1zz or stick to buying a low mile Corolla engine and hope I don't have to remove the engine for a 4th time?
 

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I'll repeat what I said on the other thread...if the oiling design flaw isn't addressed in the rebuild I wouldn't expect it to last very long. I am not an engine builder/rebuilder so you can take that with a grain of salt. If going for a "new" engine make sure its an 03+ 1zz to give the best chance to avoid said issues.

FYI to search you need to use Google & add 'Spyderchat' to your query. The forum search function has been non-functional for at least 2-3 site owners
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What is the oiling design flare and how does one address it?

Edited;

On a side note I found a wrecked 130k 03 vibe for $400 roughly two hours away that I might look into.
 

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What is the oiling design flare and how does one address it?

Edited;

On a side note I found a wrecked 130k 03 vibe for $400 roughly two hours away that I might look into.
It's not really a design flaw, per se. The issue is that - if the vehicle wasn't taken care of (long intervals for oil change along with conventional or poor-quality oil) - the holes that control oil flow in the pistons to return said oil back to the crankcase - will clog up with sediment and thus seize your control rings over a time period with nowhere else for oil on the cylinder walls to go except for up into the combustion chamber to get burned off.
 

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The issue of rebuild quality really depends on your definition of "rebuild". Throwing new rings and bearings in an engine in my opinion isn't a rebuild, just a refresh and only works well when the main parts like the block, crankshaft, cylinder head, etc don't have a lot of wear. But when an engine has a lot of miles, or a failure (like excessive oil consumption, or a spun bearing), a proper rebuild is taking everything back to factory specs. That means even doing less obvious things like checking piston pin clearances, main bearing bores in the block, crack checking, etc That will take a lot of new parts, a lot of expertise, and significant cost. When new short blocks and long blocks were available, buying new would often be cheaper.

A refresh may get by for a short time, but many of the rebuild "failures" occur because corners were cut to save money. When a car is 20 years old, and the chassis has a lot of miles, it is difficult to justify the cost of a truly professional rebuild.

Finding a good used engine is also problematic, as most already have a lot of miles, or uncertain histories. Even a low mileage engine that has sat in a scrap yard for a few years may have deteriorated quite a bit from the elements and be little more than a good core.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That rebuilt engine I have, I would assume it was done the way you guys are describing because it's very clean on the outside, the inside of the head looks like new, I haven't pulled the head but I seem to recall the lower part of the block looking clean and the timing area looking clean.

Anyways, what would you guys say to me taking that engine and putting a different crank/bearings/etc back into that engine.

It burned zero oil, just the oil pump failed on it.

I guess another question I'm kinda asking is if the oil pump failure would damage other important things I couldn't see other than the crank.
 

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Not just the crank/bearings, no oil = no cylinder walls. Be thorough when you check things out
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How do you guys feel about a 30k mile 05 Corolla engine that's in a wrecked car that been sitting indoors for 7 years?

Would you take the chance on the engine?

It's 500 monies.
 

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I'd do a leak down first. A compression test might show false low compression on an engine that hasn't run in years - if you want to do a compression test the engine should be started and let run to full operating temp plus I'd hold it at 2000 - 3000 for a minute or two and give it a couple quick revs. That will also tell you a lot about its condition.

If it can't be started then a leak down will be your best source of info but I'd do both to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
It can't be started, it is a wrecked parts car, but according to the guy I've been talking to the shop owner pulled the fuel lines at some point.
 

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The only feature of the 1zz that is unconventional and not easily reconditioned are the valve seats in the cylinder head. Instead of conventional valve set inserts pressed-in to the aluminum, Toyota uses laser-welded material to create the seats (also known as laser-clad). These work very well and improve the heat-transfer from the valves to the heads, allow more valve area compared to conventional seats, and have excellent wear-resistance. The downside is that if you do wear them excessively, i am not sure if you can find a machine shop who can custom make an insert that will fit. For normal wear, you can recut them like any other valve seat. Details are in the shop manual.

Dave
 

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I wouldn't say they don't rebuild well. I've rebuilt several with good luck. The problem isn't that the 1zz doesn't rebuild well, it's that it doesn't exist well. Toyota was very cheap about the zz engine family. Poor oiling and weakness everywhere they had never skimped on before. In short, the zz engines are the worst Toyota has ever put their name on.
 
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