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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


So I found an online retailer who is selling the ARC Coolfins for cheap. I picked up a few and they would be in this weekend. Essentially they are taped on heatsinks. I will be placing them on my new oil pan as soon as I get the pan and the crank scrapers oil pick up extender.

As far as testing the effectiveness, is surface temp of the oil pan sufficient?
 

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Those heatsink won't make a difference. There is no metal to metal contact between the fins and the pan. Heat transfer doesn't work well with a layer of tape in between... and they will probably fall off once the heat melts the adhesive.
 

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I recommend butter and salt to flavor that rice. :lol:
Weren't you in the OBX thread talking about quality, advising people to buy stuff that is a good product and not buying junk? irony! At any rate, the fins don't do much for the reasons listed above, and also because your oil pan is not going to see much air flow. Or, rather, it shouldn't be seeing much air flow.

I would advise buying an oil cooler if you feel your oil temps will be a issue. Used ones pop up from time to time in the private sales section and they are basically install and forget.
 

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On the bright side, you now have a hell of a cheese grater.
 

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Well since you already got em I wouldn't mind a follow up with some temp readings if possible just for arguments sake. Maybe with one of those laser pointer temp guns with very similar drive cycles before/after.

People are always quick to jump to conclusion and the fact is, if it is or isn't, is not the point. If someone already bought, well shit lets test it out to find out the facts. Wouldn't you want to know the facts instead of saying whatever you THINK it will or wont do?

SDSU i don't know about you but my oil pan is the lowest thing in the air path of my car other than my intake cone. It gets tons of airflow. I'm pretty sure they also designed it to get as much air flow as is reasonable. Look at the stock diaper, has slats cut into it right before the oil pan.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I recommend butter and salt to flavor that rice. :lol:
Weren't you in the OBX thread talking about quality, advising people to buy stuff that is a good product and not buying junk? irony! At any rate, the fins don't do much for the reasons listed above, and also because your oil pan is not going to see much air flow. Or, rather, it shouldn't be seeing much air flow.

I would advise buying an oil cooler if you feel your oil temps will be a issue. Used ones pop up from time to time in the private sales section and they are basically install and forget.
Oil cooler is on its way actually. There are a few reviews out there that shows that they work. Japanese magazines shows a 1-5 degree C drop. Which is pretty darn good. Turbo Magazine and Modified tested them out as well I believe.

The tape works because its 3M's heat transfer tape. There are copper wire within the tape that transfers the heat from the surface to the heat sink.

As far as air flow goes, there is plenty of air flow. There are slots from the diffuser/diaper that lets air in right near the oil pan and exits aft of the pan. Not to mention that air is coming in from the side ducts. So with all of the air flowing in to the bay area, that should be more then enough to move air out. Kind of a gradient effect. The only time there is not air moving would be at a stand still. So air flow is not my concern.

For the price I got them for, heck, it's worth a try. 20 bucks for 4. MSRP is 40 each.


Link to the 3M tape site for those who don't believe.
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/...ons/ThermallyConductiveAdhesiveTransferTapes/
 

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For the price I got them for, heck, it's worth a try. 20 bucks for 4. MSRP is 40 each.
I would think its better to weld them on or something to make them more legit. Regarding the price, I don't think its worth it being that its embarrassing. I'm sure if you had a GF she would be pissed that you spent that much on that.

About the 1-2 degree cooler. Why do you want the oil to be cooler? Is it running too hot? Doesn't oil flow better at operating temperature to lubricate the delicate pistons and rings?

Didn't want to be harsh, so I hope it works and you notice the performance difference/advantage.
cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I would think its better to weld them on or something to make them more legit. Regarding the price, I don't think its worth it being that its embarrassing. I'm sure if you had a GF she would be pissed that you spent that much on that.

About the 1-2 degree cooler. Why do you want the oil to be cooler? Is it running too hot? Doesn't oil flow better at operating temperature to lubricate the delicate pistons and rings?

Didn't want to be harsh, so I hope it works and you notice the performance difference/advantage.
cheers
I want it to be as cool as I can get it because I am going to be running the snot out of it this summer. Track days last year wasn't too temp friendly on my MK2 Turbo. Days were 80's degree F. That plus hard runs = extra hot oil = reduction in performance. But then again that was a turbo car, a different beast then my N/A setup this time around.

BTW, my earlier posts mentioned Celsius not Fahrenheit. So if you convert it, 1 degree C = 33.8 degrees F. For 20 bucks, that is a great deal of bang for the buck. To give you some insight, a normal car sees around 210-220 degrees F on the streets. Track duty it can get to 300 or beyond.

I'm also going to be running a heavier oil for track this year as well so that will keep the oil from degrading.

Btw, how is it embarrassing?? You can't even see it when it's installed. Please think of the placement. And you cannot weld aluminum to steel.
 

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Don't worry about what other people think, they think what they want. If it works great, at the track you need all the help you can get in the cooling area. If not you lose 20 bucks an have to something weird on your oil pan. At pacific it's a fairly wide open track where you are on the throttle for long periods of time.
 

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BTW, my earlier posts mentioned Celsius not Fahrenheit. So if you convert it, 1 degree C = 33.8 degrees F. For 20 bucks, that is a great deal of bang for the buck. To give you some insight, a normal car sees around 210-220 degrees F on the streets. Track duty it can get to 300 or beyond.
You may be laboring under a misconception:
1°C = 33.8°F, but 1C° = 1.8F°
 

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fascinating...if you might have 2''X4" piece left over i 'd like to buy it
 

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That thing is not going to put a dent in oil temps. I have the data to back it up because I built my own heat sinks which are far better then that piece of crap. I even mounted them using arctic silver conductive epoxy and mine were far better in every way.

In edition to all of this I modified an oil filter cooler to work with our filters and that also was one hell of a heat sink.

I was planing on making money on this whole cooling kit after investing my time and energy doing so and the result was zero effectiveness in the reduction of oil temps.

In retrospect I should have made and sold it because I tend to forget there is a market for rice.

I am willing to put up a $200 challenge for anyone that can prove the effectiveness of that ARC heat sink based on the claims.
 

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To give you some insight, a normal car sees around 210-220 degrees F on the streets. Track duty it can get to 300 or beyond.
I have a problem with this "300 or beyond" because at this point the tinsel strength of internals are not only compromised but the engine is toast before it even reaches 300.

The only way to reduce oil temps is an oil cooler period. Playing around with unproven rice without addressing real oil temp issues is a costly experiment.
 

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Oil cooler is on its way actually. There are a few reviews out there that shows that they work. Japanese magazines shows a 1-5 degree C drop. Which is pretty darn good. Turbo Magazine and Modified tested them out as well I believe.

The tape works because its 3M's heat transfer tape. There are copper wire within the tape that transfers the heat from the surface to the heat sink.

As far as air flow goes, there is plenty of air flow. There are slots from the diffuser/diaper that lets air in right near the oil pan and exits aft of the pan. Not to mention that air is coming in from the side ducts. So with all of the air flowing in to the bay area, that should be more then enough to move air out. Kind of a gradient effect. The only time there is not air moving would be at a stand still. So air flow is not my concern.

For the price I got them for, heck, it's worth a try. 20 bucks for 4. MSRP is 40 each.


Link to the 3M tape site for those who don't believe.
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/...ons/ThermallyConductiveAdhesiveTransferTapes/
What sort of cars where they tested on? I would assume front engine, where there is more air flow through the engine bay. Yes, the Spyder has those vents in the under panel, but they are only letting in a fraction of the air from under the car. 1-5 degrees is a pretty large spread, and the lower end of the spectrum, 1 degree, is so slight that it could easily mean "these didn't do anything." I remain unconvinced but i will never turn down the opportunity to be proven wrong.

If you don't have the equipment to monitor the oil in real time then you can measure the surface temperature of the pan. I suspect I am suggesting things you already know, but... make sure to take measurements at different points on the pan and do many runs. I image you will see a lot of variation based on: 1. how hard you drive to 'warm' up the oil,and 2. the ambient temperature, and 3. how long it takes you to park your car, get out, grab the IR device (or whatever) then take your measurements. Your results will likely be seen critically due to #2. Some time will pass between your runs with the fins and without, because there will be a space of time between the two measurements... specifically the time it takes to install these things. If you could also record the ambient air temperature close to the ground then I think that will help validate the results.
 

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IMHO a real oil cooler would be the solution. I owned a 1962 Alfa Romeo Guiletta Veloce with a gated aluminum oil pan with a built in cooler of sorts on the bottem with fins in the air flow. I never took measurements but suspect it worked well, aluminum condusts heat very well. It would be possible to do the same with the spyder but time and dollars would be very high. Performance and value indicate add on oil cooler mounted in the air flow. If I still have a fluid temp meter I might just measure a stock spyder oil in pan temp on a hot day after a hard run. Or maybe I should make, with help, a aluminum gated, cooled oil pan. My buddy would love the challenge.
 
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