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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in a Condo and have parked my car in underground parking for storage. Unfortunately there are no electrical outlets there. I have seen lithium ion battery boosters but is there such a thing as a lithium ion charger/maintainer that I could put on there once a month. Also being in a condo I wouldn't be a fan of having a battery on my kitchen countertop. Open to creative ideas.
 

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If you really want to keep it on a trickle/maintain charge then I'd take the battery out of the car and keep on the charger inside the condo somewhere, not the kitchen counter though. It really depends on how long it's going to be stored for and giving consideration to other parts of the car as well besides the battery. It may be easier to just start it up and let it run periodically.
 

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If its long term I'd remove the battery & put it on a maintainer for 24hrs or so at a time (if you can't leave it plugged in long term). Disconnecting it is also fine, a quality maintainer will cycle the battery to keep it lasting longer. If its short term storage (a few weeks) just leave it in the car.
 

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I don't care for the idea of idling for long periods of time or even letting a car warm up before driving. I would either drive the car every few days for a half hour or disconnect the battery. I drive mine every couple of days through out the N Va winter using all season tires.
 

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I think that you want to avoid running the engine and then shutting it down before it is completely warmed up. Much of the exhaust is water vapor, and it will condense in the crankcase and exhaust if it has a chance. Once you get everything up to running temperature, the moisture has a chance to dissipate before things cool off enough to allow condensation. That said, I don't like idling a car either. I prefer to go out for a joyride whenever the roads are clean.
 

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I don't start my spyder in the cold and let it idle until warmed up before driving. I start it and run for a short time then slowing start driving. I like to get the oil to temp as fast as possible without using a high load or full throttle, usually limiting the rpm to 3k or so the first couple of minutes and keep it easy until close to 190 degrees or so. A bit later I can see that the oil pressure is at its normal hot psi at idle. And yes it is much more fun to take it for a spin :) just not in salted snow :(
 

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Winter storage is more than just maintaining the battery. I have a "procedure" I follow every winter (prior to Thanksgiving). Note: I have a garage.
1. Fill the tank and add an appropriate amount of Stabil. (Car starts instantly in the spring)
2. Give the car a good cleaning, inside and out!
3. Put a bag over the exhaust tip so the mice stay out.
4. If the car is going to sit, put extra air in the tires to prevent flat spotting (I set mine at 40 psi). Don't forget to reset the pressures in the spring.
5. I disconnect the battery and hook-up a battery minder. I used to pull the battery, but no longer. I don't think it's necessary, just extra work.
6. I put a medium coat of vinyl/rubber protectant on the soft top. It will "soak into" the material over the winter. 20 y.o. top and it's in perfect condition.
6. Put a cover over the car and wish for spring.

Good luck to all and happy holidays!
 
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If your condo parking is heated, all I'd bother doing is unhooking the battery and airing up the tires. Like others have said, starting the car is pointless unless you are going to get it all the way up to temp, and depending where you are in Canada that might be tricky with no winter tires (unless you want to idle it for 20-30 minutes).
I've got mine parked in the garage and lowered the insurance to just fire and theft until the spring to save some money for mods next year.
 

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Winter storage is more than just maintaining the battery. I have a "procedure" I follow every winter (prior to Thanksgiving). Note: I have a garage.
1. Fill the tank and add an appropriate amount of Stabil. (Car starts instantly in the spring)
2. Give the car a good cleaning, inside and out!
3. Put a bag over the exhaust tip so the mice stay out.
4. If the car is going to sit, put extra air in the tires to prevent flat spotting (I set mine at 40 psi). Don't forget to reset the pressures in the spring.
5. I disconnect the battery and hook-up a battery minder. I used to pull the battery, but no longer. I don't think it's necessary, just extra work.
6. I put a medium coat of vinyl/rubber protectant on the soft top. It will "soak into" the material over the winter. 20 y.o. top and it's in perfect condition.
6. Put a cover over the car and wish for spring.

Good luck to all and happy holidays!
Excellent advice. I spent years in the marine business where equipement was stored for up to 6 months, and that is pretty close to what we did for winter storage. The only major differences were we ran a fogging oil through the engine, and normally changed oil before storage. Some people suggested changing in the spring, but changing in the fall removed any lingering moisture and debris. Moisture from condensation was a big issue in marine engines. Oiling the cylinders isn't easy on a car, and the extra oil is not good for catalytic converters so that can be skipped.

Adding a fuel stabilizer is a good idea as you never know how old the fuel is at a station. Plus, you may not drive as much in the fall as the weather gets cold, so the fuel may be in the tank longer than expected. Plus, it doesn't hurt anything, so why take a chance?

Just disconnecting the battery won't prevent it from losing charge. A lead acid battery will "self-discharge at about 4% per week, so a battery maintainer / battery tender is a good idea. We got more than 11 years from a battery that was put on a battery tender when the car sat for any extended period (more than 3 weeks)

Battery Basics - Progressive Dynamics
 

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Well I hv the GB150 jump start and G3500 trickle/ maintenance charger from Noco. I'd get the GB150 (yes its alot over the top) but youll be able to jump your and others if they need your help. Id also start twice a wk for atleast 20min. Since i dont know the type / age of battery you hv ... my new battery is the antigravity atx20 rs 4lbs battery w 5 built in jump restarts (if the battery is dead) 680 cca - has a life of 8 to 10 yrs costs about 280 us dollars so lots of options
 

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I have a trickle charger I use to use ( now on the MCs )...
but if you have a garage door opener and regular charger you can use that.
When the opener goes up/down, my light stays on for about 10 mins... this was always plenty to keep the car battery up without over charging
 

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And where would he plug in a trickle charger as he doesn't have access to an outlet? I live in Wisconsin and have the same problem. I have underground heated parking with no access to electricity. For those saying to simply disconnect the battery, I glad you live in states with no emission testing. IF I disconnect the battery the computer goes into "not ready" mode for emission testing and it's a bitch getting it into "ready" mode.
 

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Just need to drive it enough to get the system into ready mode, one full tank of fuel should be more than enough.

Regarding self discharge, for lead acid chemistry it is HIGHLY temperature dependent. At 80F you are for sure looking at some 4% per week so in warmer climates/seasons if the car is going to be parked for an extended period it's important to plug it in. For those parking the car due to cold, the self discharge rate is around 0.5% per week at 60F and even less as the temperature drops further, making the 'unplug and leave it' strategy a sound one. 0.5% loss compounded over 26 weeks is like 12% or so.
 

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If your condo parking is heated, all I'd bother doing is unhooking the battery and airing up the tires. Like others have said, starting the car is pointless unless you are going to get it all the way up to temp, and depending where you are in Canada that might be tricky with no winter tires (unless you want to idle it for 20-30 minutes).
I've got mine parked in the garage and lowered the insurance to just fire and theft until the spring to save some money for mods next year.
I should also add that an AGM style lead acid has even lower self discharge and is much more compatible with the occasional deep cycle.
[/QUOTE
If your condo parking is heated, all I'd bother doing is unhooking the battery and airing up the tires. Like others have said, starting the car is pointless unless you are going to get it all the way up to temp, and depending where you are in Canada that might be tricky with no winter tires (unless you want to idle it for 20-30 minutes).
I've got mine parked in the garage and lowered the insurance to just fire and theft until the spring to save some money for mods next year.
I forgot to add: For winter storage, call your insurance company and lower your coverage to fire and theft. It may save you enough to pay for your next battery, if you should need it.
 
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