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Discussion Starter #1
I think I am finally, after 12 years and 140K miles, starting to see some slight clutch slippage when aggressively accelerating in 3rd and 4th gear.

I consulted with my trusted mechanic and he said I should try to locate a TRD clutch.
If I can not find a TRD clutch, he said I should try to locate an ACT flywheel and Exedy clutch, both being the "street" or "stage 1" version.

Does anyone know if there are TRD clutches available anywhere or anyone who might have one for sale? The ACT and Exedy items I can probably find by doing a search but I prefer to find the TRD if I can.

Thanks as always
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Don't waste your time with all that. Daiken clutch, OE quality, and is the manufacturer of most aftermarket clutches, including Exedy. Why do you want a lightened flywheel? I assume you don't use the car for autocross...
I really don't know much about clutches and flywheels, I am only regurgitating what my mechanic said. I think he mentioned 12 lbs would be a good weight.(?)

I will check into the Daiken, thanks.
 

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I have to agree with Oldman.

For the most part OEM parts are designed to be a good and durable compromise.
A lightened flywheel might allow your engine to rev just a bit quicker, at the trade off of being slightly harder to launch, etc...

Go aftermarket if you're trying to get somewhere, or if you have an itch you need to scratch.
But if you're happy with what you car has been doing, why change it?
 

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I have driven Spyders with lightened flywheels and what I have found is that I don't like them as much.
The street is a different animal and that momentum from the right weight flywheel keeps it going especially on gradients.
 

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I have driven Spyders with lightened flywheels and what I have found is that I don't like them as much.
The street is a different animal and that momentum from the right weight flywheel keeps it going especially on gradients.
That makes sense to me Dev. It seems to me like the low end torque would be diminished. These little Spyder engines don't have very much revolving mass to begin with. I think that some folks don't understand that torque and horsepower are different, and that torque is what actually moves a car.
 

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That makes sense to me Dev. It seems to me like the low end torque would be diminished. These little Spyder engines don't have very much revolving mass to begin with. I think that some folks don't understand that torque and horsepower are different, and that torque is what actually moves a car.
I think it's the feeling of low end torque missing but I think it has a lot to do with a loss of momentum.
Ironically sports cars made for the twisties like the Ferrari's have been traditionally described as momentum vehicles. The first gear is for parking and everything starts at the second gear and so forth with long legs to keep the speed up. Now in this day and age it's different because of launch control and an abundance of horsepower.

I like a grabby clutch with the stock flywheel because when I shift it feels positive and knocks you back a little. If you are not out to win races, there is nothing more rewarding then having a positive driving experience.
 

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If you've had your Spyder for 12 years, you must have an early one.
Have you removed the pre-cats?
Is it burning oil?

I'm beginning to suspect that that the engine, clutch, & transmission were all designed with the same expected lifetime. As a result, I'm contemplating replacing the entire drive-line when my clutch begins slipping. It would be cheaper in the long run.
OM I think the transmission can last upwards of over 200k miles. I believe the reason for the failures is bad luck mixed with bad shifting due to abuse. I have always believed you can make the transmission do what you want and not abuse it. I think abuse is an inefficient way to drive with bad outcomes.
 

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Agreed.
But I'm still contemplating a complete drive-line replacement when the time comes.
Nothing like having a fresh set of synchronizers bathed in GL4 form the start.
 

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Don't bother with a TRD clutch. They are way overpriced for what they are. They are made by Daiken Clutch anyways (well, the pressure plate is for sure...the disc I'm not 100% sure, but I feel safe assuming) which makes Exedy clutches. Any Exedy clutch that meets your driving habits would be fine. They make an OEM replacement, a full-face "sport" replacement (called Stage1)...and I think a 3-puck Stage 2 clutch which is more than most people need. I've owned two Exedy clutches (one was a TRD MR2 clutch) and they are great.

As for a lightweight flywheel.....I'd HIGHLY recommend one, but this is where you may need to spend some more serious cash. Chromoly flywheels are the strongest. C-one and TRD make chromoly, but I think you'd have to have them shipped from Japan - I don't think the TRD unit is readily available in the US any more. $400 plus shipping or more. Fidanza has a reputation for being more prone to failure. Back when the Fidanza came out, there was much discussion over the quality and source of their materials............BUT............I don't think we've ever heard of one failing on this board. Unless you're not very adept at driving, I see no reason for you not to get a lightweight flywheel. You'll love it.
 

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Obviously, the respondants do not agree upon the desirability of a lightened flywheel.
I strongly urge you to seek out a Spyder that has a lightened flywheel and take it for a drive.
Doing so will allow you to avoid a costly mistake, whichever side of the debate you're on.
Agreed.+1 What did it for me is the fact that it did not make a big impact on acceleration to justify the cost and drawback.
 

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I'm running an RPS flywheel, somewhere in the 9.5 lbs range. It's not bad, but I'd prefer a little heavier for the street. Somehow I still have to think about it every time I take off from a stop. I don't think I'd mind it if the engine had more low-end grunt, but it is what it is. For no scientific reason, I feel something smack between stock flywheel weight and this one would be perfect.
 

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i have a fidanza flywheel with a oem clutch and pressure plate just installed at 140k very happy with the end result winds up quick shifts like butter :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If you've had your Spyder for 12 years, you must have an early one.
Have you removed the pre-cats?
Is it burning oil?

I'm beginning to suspect that that the engine, clutch, & transmission were all designed with the same expected lifetime. As a result, I'm contemplating replacing the entire drive-line when my clutch begins slipping. It would be cheaper in the long run.
It is an early 2000 model, purchased just weeks after they hit the market.
There is no evidence of oil leaking or oil burning (smoke from exhaust) but it does seem to devour about 1 quart every 250 miles or so.

I just changed to the Castrol European formula that has been reviewed favorably here and it really does quiet down the engine.....it is amazing what a difference it makes.

My plan is to go with OEM clutch and flywheel.

Anyone have a new one for sale?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
i have a fidanza flywheel with a oem clutch and pressure plate just installed at 140k very happy with the end result winds up quick shifts like butter :lol:
Same mileage as mine, perhaps I will follow suit with the fidanza and oem combo.
Thanks
 
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