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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Before installing and tuning an eManage Blue, the following dyno baselines were measured.

the dyno
Dyno runs were done on a Land & Sea Chassis dyno with 24" rollers, capable of handling 1,200 whp. This dyno has a 'weather station' and all runs were adjusted for atmospheric conditions. I'm told that this dyno, typically, reads LOWER (i.e. more conservative) than the Mustang dynos.

The car has (retains) the following stock parts:

  • stock air filter
  • stock plugs (with 30,000+ miles on them)
  • stock catalytic converter
  • stock muffler
  • stock ECU - NO piggyback or replacement ECU
  • Cumberland Farms Gulf 87 octane gas
The only engine 'performance' modifications are:

  • clothes-dryer 3" cold air induction, routed to the driver's side vent (see photo album link: http://spyderchat.com/forums/album.php?albumid=131)
  • ported Che header (see Search and photo album link, below)
  • slightly taller and heavier Goodyear GS-D3 225/50-16 tires on the rear.
the Budget

$230 ( ~$5 for 3" clothes-dryer tubing + ~$225 for a CHE header) is not bad for a ~134 whp, quiet, stock-sounding (required, here in R.I.) street go-kart.

dyno results

Though I don't have showroom stock baselines, I've read SpyderChat dyno results ~6 years and have seen plenty of evidence that the stock 1ZZ MR2 makes 117 - 120 whp.

The first run yielded 128 whp with cold-start enrichment and no dyno fan in 3rd gear.

http://spyderchat.com/forums/album.php?albumid=129&pictureid=808

The Second run
with the engine, now, warm yielded 124 whp, also in 3rd gear.

Knowing that 3rd gear would impair SpyderChat credibility, I asked for 4th gear runs. At this time, we turned on the dyno fan, pointing backwards from in front of the driver's side door (i.e. just behind the left front wheel) - so one could get in and out of the car on the dyno.

The dyno fan down the driver's side bumped us to the 132 - 134 whp range.

http://spyderchat.com/forums/album.php?albumid=129&pictureid=809

Since 135 whp was 'my dream' after eManage Blue tuning, I was stunned ... and incredulous!

dyno run .jpg's
I uploaded the dyno .jpg's to a SpyderChat "photo album", here: http://spyderchat.com/forums/album.php?albumid=129 Mouse over them for explanations and click on them - to view larger, more legible versions.

My old PMD (Poor Man's Dyno ... Search) runs indicated a measurable kick from the 3" "clothes-dryer CAI" (also Search) and from the ported CHE header. Knowing how most are, typically, disappointed in dyno runs - from high expectations, I hoped for 122 - 123 whp.

Joe, the local dyno guy, has tons of experience with 4 cylinder modifications, including countless turbo results in the 400 - 700 whp range. When Joe drove this car to the shop, he felt that it was noticeably stronger than the 117 - 120 whp, I reported that the stock 1zz's produce.

When I bought the eManage Blue harness and software from MonkeyWrenchRacing and indicated a ported Che header, Matt said that they did not have a 'map' for that (and that I would have to dyno tune it) ... which surprised me to no end, given all their experience. Now, I see why!

porting the CHE header
I spent a couple of days with carbide burrs on an electric drill, carefully matching the gasket to the head ports and, in turn, matching the gasket to the Che header, including smoothing the entry angles into the header primary pipes. Search for old posts for photos of this ... and see the photo album at: http://spyderchat.com/forums/album.php?albumid=130 It, actually, ran quieter after the porting, presumably, since reversion back into the head was eliminated.

Looking at the Che head flange, you'll see about 1/8" of the primary tubing thickness FACING the exhaust port. This primary pipe "lip" causes high-velocity exhaust gases to bounce back from that lip i.e. back into the exhaust port path. This exhaust "reversion" causes exhaust turbulance, exactly where smooth, uninterrupted flow is most critical ... right at the head.

You see, exhaust gas pressure and velocity is higher, exiting the combustion chamber ... than farther down the exhaust stream ... like in the cat or muffler. So, it's critical that the exhaust path at the port be uninterrupted and smooth.

I used a carbide burr on a drill to smooth the end of that primary pipe, making a nice cone-like entrance ... into the primary pipe from the flange. I, also, made sure that the cone-like primary pipe entrance was at least as large as the exhaust port on the engine head - to eliminate reversion and turbulance at this most critical point in the exhaust system.

In fact, we all laughed at it on the dyno because it was so quiet, compared to the usual dyno racket, that one could clearly hear the tire noise on the knurled dyno rollers! :)

Why 3", as opposed to 5", clothes-dryer tubing?

1. Toyota used approximately 3" diameter tubing for the intake tube, shielded in the fender well. 3" tubing approximately matches that fender-well tubing AND the fender and air-filter box entrance/exit "holes" ... making for smooth transitions and easy fitting.
2. Large tubing means less air velocity in the tubing. Look up the Bernouli equation, describing the relationships between air volume, pressure and velocity. To get increased air velocity and some resulting increased torque, Toyota created a little venturi (pipe narrowing) in the plastic pipe between the air filter entrance and the rear fender tubing exit. However, this venturi narrowing restricts air flow over 6,500 rpm, partially resulting in the 1ZZ gasping for air over 6,500 rpm and falling off in power. So, I by-passed that plastic "venturi-pipe" with straight 3" clothes-dryer tubing. This let the engine 'pull' strongly past 6,500 rpm ... at the 'expense' of a wee bit of lower rpm torque.

Observations
I've always suspected that that stock muffler, being one BIG can - even though it reverses flow, was not much of a restriction/bottleneck - at least within the breathing and rpm range of normally aspirated modifications (e.g. 140 - 170 chp or 120 - 150 whp). Remember, the mufflers and catalytic converters on common factory sedans, that make 200 - 250 chp, are not much, if any, bigger than the Toyota 1ZZ muffler and catalytic converter! Forced induction (turbo's and superchargers), of course, require a different order of magnitude of breathing capability than could be had through the stock cat and muffler.

Somewhere, I read that a downpipe manufacturer (HKS or some such) claimed that the difference between a straight downpipe and a cat-downpipe was only 3 - 6 hp. Thus, I, also, suspect that, within the range of normally-aspirated running, the stock catalytic converter is not so restrictive as to prevent a 1ZZ from breathing at least to 150 whp. Again, compare our 1ZZ cat with the cat size on a Camry or Malibu v6 etc.

Joe, the dyno-mechanic, tells me that each 10* F reduces power by ~1%. Since engine bays easily reach 120* F to 150* F, even on 90* F day there's a 50* differencial between outside temperature and engine bay temperature. That means at least 5% power loss to those with those cone air filters inside the engine bay. Newsflash: cone air filters inside the engine bay are NOT "cold-air induction". Hot engine bay air is evil ! It is less dense with needed oxygen for combustion. Remember, they don't use intercoolers in turbo systems just because they like Christmas ornaments! Intercoolers provide cooler air, which is more dense with oxygen - for combustion.

Each dyno run showed the engine willing to pull strongly to and past 7,000 rpm, rather than running out of breath after 6,500 rpm (in the showroom stock car). One can clearly see the fuel cutoff at about 6,800 rpm; then, it re-supplies fuel ... for a moment. Note that the reported dyno-rpm results from a tires-to-dyno-rollers calculation, taken at a car-tach-indicated 3,000 rpm.

Lessons
Two points are really essential to achieving these results:

1. Getting truly cold, oxygen-dense air (NOT hot, engine-bay air) into the engine.
2. an unrestricted, smooth exit from the head into the header

Air velocity is not as high or critical, further downstream in the exhaust system, as it is exiting the combustion chamber and head port.

Say it's a nice 70* F day and the engine compartment air is 140* F. That's 70* F hotter engine compartment air than outside air, which translates to a 7% loss in power. 7% of 150 whp = ~10 hp lost. At $100/hp, it costs $1,000 to obtain 10 hp. Are you willing to just give that away?

Future expectations
Joe, the dyno-mechanic, tells me that installing and tuning the eManage Blue for 87 octane should produce another 10 whp. Personally, I can't see spending an extra $0.25 - $0.50 per gallon for 91 octane gas, forever, just for another 5 whp. I'm too frugal (i.e. cheap ^_^ ) for that.

(135 whp + 10 whp) / .87 (for 13% drive-train loss) = ~166 chp

Having read that Toyota engineers claim that the stock 1ZZ connecting rods are good to 7,400 rpm, I will set the eManage Blue to cut off fuel at ~7,250 rpm. Running without fuel cutoff up through 7,000 rpm should produce a good ~5 whp. So, (135 + 10 + 5) / 0.87 = 172 chp.

----- Thanks -------

Joe, the dyno-mechanic, did a transaxle pull and replaced 5th gear with the 0.75 ratio Corolla 5th gear (about $220 from Carson Toyota). Joe will post a separate thread with tips on doing that. fyi: it resulted in ~340 rpm 5th gear drop i.e. ~2,950 rpm at 65 mph, instead of ~3,350 rpm.

---------------------------

I wish to thank Joe of http://OnDemandPerformance.com for his guidance, persistence and patience in these discoveries. He's an enthusiastic seeker of performance ... with a soft heart for racers. He won't gouge you; don't hesitate to deal with him. Joe is that #1 in a million knowledgeable, enthusiastic and painfully honest mechanic for whom everybody searches! He's down the hill from me in the southwest corner of Rhode Island, near the southeast corner of Connecticut.
 

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What a wonderful and informative post. Can i ask why you still went with stock intake routing rather than a more direct or possibly "ram air" approach?

-Spargo
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ram air

What a wonderful and informative post. Can i ask why you still went with stock intake routing rather than a more direct or possibly "ram air" approach?
-Spargo
Thank you, Spargo. I hoped it would shed light on various unproven theories ...

Remembering the 70's drag racing days, successful drag racers looked for high-pressure areas - to achieve that "ram-air" result. One such high pressure area was beneath the front bumper; another was at the base of the windshield (remember the rear-facing scoops at the base of windshields? High air pressure, there, was the reason.).

Toward the rear, I wasn't so sure where the high-pressure areas are really located. One area might be beneath the rear bumper?

After considering all of the above, I decided that the side inlet was, probably, a reasonably high-pressure area. Without a dyno fan, blowing down the side of the car, we saw 127 - 128 whp. With the fan simulating highway air down the side of the car, we, instantly, saw 132 - 134 whp. Since the dyno validated the guess and the PMD measurements and the strong, pulling feeling, especially between 6,500 and 7,000 rpm, the existing side air inlet looks like a reasonable solution.
 

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Interesting thought, I think for me I went away from that concept because I don't like the opportunity for heat soak in all that piping, I wish we could get your setup and then a short ram air setup on a dyno on the same engine in the same car back to back ha ha, but it might be tough to pull off.

-Spargo
 

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The stock cat does hurt it quite a bit. It has tiny little passages at one point (Blackcreek showed a pic). The stock muffler's problem is that it is at least 10 lbs heavier than necessary and you'll feel handling improved by changing it. A lightweight battery is a good buy for improving power to weight. There are better intakes than stock - you just have to tune the eManage for them. So there are still quite a few easy mods "left on the table" for NA performance.

Sorry to read about the health problems.
 

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Great thread and thanks for taking the time to post all your information and observations.

The only thing I would disagree with is this:

Joe, the dyno-mechanic, tells me that each 10* F reduces power by ~1%. Since engine bays easily reach 120* F to 150* F, even on 90* F day there's a 50* differencial between outside temperature and engine bay temperature. That means at least 5% power loss to those with those cone air filters inside the engine bay. Newsflash: cone air filters inside the engine bay are NOT "cold-air induction".
If the cone filter is located by the side vent, then it is drawing in cold air if the car is moving. Dev has IAT tests which show this. You can also make a DIY heatshield to block off the engine bay from the cone filter.

Also I can't tell from the pics but is your intake box by where the battery is or is it in the stock location behind the motor on the drivers side.

Edit: it looks like its in the stock location, so I think it would be provide better throttle response if it was placed where the battery was with the tubing reduced but still in place. I think that surrounding the inlet with tubing might limit how much air is available to be instantly used and decrease throttle response. What do you think about this idea?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
CAI piping heat soak

I don't like the opportunity for heat soak in all that piping
Most piping is in the left-rear fender, continuing forward to the driver-side inlet, which is well ventilated. The hottest spot is between the stock air filter and the fender inlet at the rear. However, the air seems to blow through it, fast enough.

What REALLY hurts are those cone air filters, near the battery - very HOT air induction, costing at least 5% of the power.
 

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just wanted to introduce myself...I am Joe from On demand performance, the shop that performed the work for Mike...I'll be putting up a post about the 5th gear swap that I did while the car was with me, as well as some better pictures of what the inside of the transmission looks like

I just wanted to say if anyone needs any info about this car or the dyno or any of the data from the weatherstation you can email me at [email protected]

Also Mike's car is a RIPPER, gotta be a tuesday car if you know what I mean...I'm seriously impressed with this little machine, and Mike's driving ability...I had to check my shorts after the test drive!

I will link to the 5th gear swap post once I get it up
 

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MC, so all you did was attach a hose to the stock air inlet behind/below the fuse box and run it forward toward the side inlet, right? Any chance of some pics?

Thanks...AND a good write-up :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
3" "clothes-dryer CAI" components

MC, so all you did was attach a hose to the stock air inlet behind/below the fuse box and run it forward toward the side inlet, right?
My "clothes-dryer CAI" consists of three pieces:

  1. from the stock air filter box to the rear fender entry
  2. the stock fender-enclosed piece
  3. from the fender exit (under the white electronics box) forward to the driver-side air vent
There doesn't appear to be significant "heat soak", since air flows through it at sufficient velocity to preclude that. As I said above, about 2/3 of it lies in cooler areas than the maximum heat of the engine compartment.

Any chance of some pics?
When I first got into this clothes-dryer hose around 2004, if memory serves, I posted a thread. Search ... should turn it up. To the photo album I added a 5th photo, showing the stock 'middle' fender-enclosed component.

Have some 'fun' playing with it; you can't hurt anything and it's the cheapest horsepower available to our MR2.
 

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My "clothes-dryer CAI" consists of three pieces:

  1. from the stock air filter box to the rear fender entry
  2. the stock fender-enclosed piece
  3. from the fender exit (under the white electronics box) forward to the driver-side air vent
There doesn't appear to be significant "heat soak", since air flows through it at sufficient velocity to preclude that. As I said above, about 2/3 of it lies in cooler areas than the maximum heat of the engine compartment.



When I first got into this clothes-dryer hose around 2004, if memory serves, I posted a thread. Search ... should turn it up. To the photo album I added a 5th photo, showing the stock 'middle' fender-enclosed component.

Have some 'fun' playing with it; you can't hurt anything and it's the cheapest horsepower available to our MR2.
I've already made my SICAI(that's SideInlet CAI) using a portion of the stock airbox-to-MAF tubing and a WeaponR filter, but I'm gonna' try something different size-wise. Eliminating all those 90* bends should allow the air to move a bit quicker.
I'll try to find that thread.

Thanks :thumbsup:
 

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Most piping is in the left-rear fender, continuing forward to the driver-side inlet, which is well ventilated. The hottest spot is between the stock air filter and the fender inlet at the rear. However, the air seems to blow through it, fast enough.

What REALLY hurts are those cone air filters, near the battery - very HOT air induction, costing at least 5% of the power.
Which is why I intend to ditch the sock and build one of my own right over the cone, although I suppose there would be more soak when not having the benefit of moving air but you've obviously shown it doesn't take a lot of flow to blow the hot out of there.

-Spargo
 

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The stock cat does hurt it quite a bit. It has tiny little passages at one point (Blackcreek showed a pic). The stock muffler's problem is that it is at least 10 lbs heavier than necessary and you'll feel handling improved by changing it. A lightweight battery is a good buy for improving power to weight. There are better intakes than stock - you just have to tune the eManage for them. So there are still quite a few easy mods "left on the table" for NA performance.

Sorry to read about the health problems.
The cat chamber itself is large for high flow but the flex couplings are fairly restrictive. Most couplings are straight through but for some reason the spyder flex sections have an inner pipe that chokes down to 1.3 inches. While this will keep flow higher at part throttle it does hurt upper end flow. I run a 2zz motor and getting rid of these things made a difference in the upper rpm ranges. I also ran the new pipe on the 1zz before the swap and felt the difference.

I think I remember the measurements at 2.0 inch ID at the flex inlet, 1.3 ID at the small flex outlet, and then dumping into 1.6 ID at the y pipe below the flex section. So if I were looking for best bang for the buck I would pull the downpipe and weld in two new two inch flex sections and then use a team moon single or borla straight through muffler. If you keep the main cat a Borla should not be loud at all and keep the droning to a minimum. On a 2zz equipped car I had a 7 hp difference just going from
the stock muffler to a team moon single. That was using the copilot dyno function before and after the same day with no other changes to intake or exhaust.
Aftermarket engine management on a N/A 1zz might not be worth the extra expense and hassle, depends on if you want to go all out. On the 2zz it is a no brainer as you are already burning premium and the ability to lower the lift point frees up a bunch of power and smooths out the power band.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
need cheaper 'downpipes'

...I would pull the downpipe and weld in two new two inch flex sections ...
... interesting post.

Yeah, I wish those flex-'downpipes' weren't $300 (or ~$450+ for the ones with a cat). I suspect that, ranking breathing bottlenecks, that would rank #3.
 

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That was a great read. Thanks for taking the time to share your results. You must be very happy with your numbers.

A few questions/comments. Are you planning to do more dyno runs after you have eManage set up? I'm curious to see what it puts down with a tune for 87 octane. Moving to 91 octane for a little more power isn't something I can do either even though I know the extra yearly fuel costs aren't that bad. It'll just bug me every time I fill up.

I think further improvements to the stock intake can lead to greater gains. Yes, the stock ducting is very good at getting cold air. But with all the pipework and airbox restrictions and resonator, it definitely doesn't flow as well as it could. I think in that way the stock system gets a plus for intake temp but a minus for flow, while an aftermarket intake gets a plus for flow but minus for temp. However, two caveats would be that intake temp will always be somewhere between ambient and engine bay temp, so extra flow could easily balance out higher temps; and to enjoy the benefits of less restrictions, you need a less restrictive exhaust path too. Without removing the flex pipe restriction, improving the cat, and improving the muffler, the perfect intake might not dyno more than a stock intake with dryer tube. This is my fear as I'm doing my own tests of an intake while logging intake vacuum (restriction) and temperature. (My gut tells me the PPE/Pelican Racing intake or Beanie's boxed off intake are as close to perfect as it gets.)

Porting the Che header seems like a GREAT idea, and it only costs time and a drill bit. Have you looked inside the stock header to see if any gains can be expected?

Lastly, what's with RI? Do they have some state-wide draconian noise restriction?

Oh I almost forgot. I'd love love love to drop ~340 revs in 5th gear.


-Jerry
 

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Sorry to interrupt your thread, but I've been wondering for some time now, how much WHP could one theoretically achieve with just the following combo (no engine work)?:

3" cold-air intake, headers, exhaust etc. & E-manage blue tuned for 98 octane fuel (which is available at most places where I live)
 

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Sorry to interrupt your thread, but I've been wondering for some time now, how much WHP could one theoretically achieve with just the following combo (no engine work)?:

3" cold-air intake, headers, exhaust etc. & E-manage blue tuned for 98 octane fuel (which is available at most places where I live)
about 135-145whp. Depending on many variables (dyno, tuner, climate, etc)
 

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CAI in the rain

After reading everything that I could find about CAI here on the SC-forum , I decided to modify my stock intake the way Mike Coughlin did ( thanks for the idea Mike ) . Instead of using the clothes-dryer tube I planned to make a scoop out of sheet metal to make the connection from the side vent to the fender-enclosed tubing . However some doubt came in my mind . What happens when you drive your car in heavy rain , or worse , if you hit a big puddle ? If you use a short ram intake with a tube feeding it through the side vent you have the same problem . Will the filter stop the raindrops and if not what will be the result ? Any thoughts ???
Thanks
 
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