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Cost of the Ferrari Italia 458: $220,000.
Price per gallon of gas in Japan: $4.58
Posting a YouTube video of you speeding in it: $0

Getting your ass busted for doing that: Pocket change
Fixed that for you. In just about every country there is a large disparity between how the wealthy and poor are punished. In this instance, the disparity is caused by the fact that the fine is not proportional to income and assets.

It think in America fines for whatever offense should be determined by a statement of income and assets and calculated thereon. Our banker overlords would never permit such a thing to happen though.
 

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This reminds me of the old Ferrari F40 video that a wealthy Japanese man made, where he hit 200 MPH. The police found the video and he went to jail. That was many many years ago.

Fixed that for you. In just about every country there is a large disparity between how the wealthy and poor are punished. In this instance, the disparity is caused by the fact that the fine is not proportional to income and assets.

It think in America fines for whatever offense should be determined by a statement of income and assets and calculated thereon. Our banker overlords would never permit such a thing to happen though.
I can see where you are coming from; however, this assumes that fines are made to punish people and not to punish crimes. The whole reason that the statue of justice in American court systems is blind is so that (theoretically) crimes are punished exactly the same no matter who commits them.

If we accept the notion that people should be punished, not their crimes, then I (being a college student because the market crashed and my electrical union put me on a three year wait list for a job) could break the law with relative impunity. I would speed everywhere at 100+ MPH knowing that the greatest fine that could be levied against me wouldn't be enough to buy a cheeseburger.

In the end, laws are made for crimes and not for people.
 

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Ferrari

It's a good video but should have been done on a closed course. I'm not a fan of being ticketed without actually being caught by police. Being fined from videos should only be done in extreme cases, which I would classify this under. At these speeds on such narrow roads could have turned out badly for somebody else with him escaping injury in the safety of his car.
 

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I don't know how many of you clicked the link, but for those of you screaming "Injustice", the doctor was arrested, for up to 6 months. THAT is a hefty speeding ticket.

6 months in the slammer.
6 months lost wages.
Criminal record.
Possibly ruined career.
...
Won't be able to sit down for 8 months.
 

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Ah...some people are killjoys. He hardly broke 75MPH. I do see he did not have much driving skill though. They should build 2 roads. One for the killjoys and one for the people who enjoy a good run in a car.
 

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I don't know how many of you clicked the link, but for those of you screaming "Injustice", the doctor was arrested, for up to 6 months. THAT is a hefty speeding ticket.

6 months in the slammer.
6 months lost wages.
Criminal record.
Possibly ruined career.
...
Won't be able to sit down for 8 months.
That's a pretty good fine. Considering that someone else could have been killed.......... If the guy is a Dr. , then I doubt his career will be ruined. Merely postponed.

So, who's that kind of driving in a Spyder and just hasn't posted it yet?
 

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In the end, laws are made for crimes and not for people.
This needs some explanation because it makes no sense.

Laws are made to set down the minimum standards of behavior. People who exhibit behavior below that standard are punished to deter future behavior that is below that standard. Sometimes we attempt to rehabilitate them too.

A fine is a deterrent. If you were fined two cents, you would not be deterred. If you were fined a few thousand dollars, you would be deterred. If a wealthy man was fined a few thousand dollars, he would not be deterred. We can conclude then that deterrence is relative to the person, not the crime.
 

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I don't know how many of you clicked the link, but for those of you screaming "Injustice", the doctor was arrested, for up to 6 months. THAT is a hefty speeding ticket.

6 months in the slammer.
6 months lost wages.
Criminal record.
Possibly ruined career.
...
Won't be able to sit down for 8 months.
I didn't realize there was a link, haha. But now that I've read it I have a different understanding: he was arrested... and that's it. His punishment could include up to 6 months jail OR a petty fine. Not the phrase 'up to.' He won't see a maximum sentence and he sure as hell won't see jail time. He was probably released on his own recognizance after being booked if he even got that far. Who knows how the Japanese do it.

Here is something many people don't know. From time to time I cause to be issued a civil bench warrant for someone's arrest. The picture in your mind are two police officers visiting you at home, putting you in hand cuffs, and driving you to the police station then letting you sit in jail for 48 hours or until charges are brought. What actually happens are one of two things: the police visit you, tell you you are under arrest, then release you on the spot if you promise to appear at court, or they mail you a letter saying you are to appear at court on a certain date. Yeah, that's it.

I the doctor will see similar treatment.
 

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This needs some explanation because it makes no sense.

Laws are made to set down the minimum standards of behavior. People who exhibit behavior below that standard are punished to deter future behavior that is below that standard. Sometimes we attempt to rehabilitate them too.

A fine is a deterrent. If you were fined two cents, you would not be deterred. If you were fined a few thousand dollars, you would be deterred. If a wealthy man was fined a few thousand dollars, he would not be deterred. We can conclude then that deterrence is relative to the person, not the crime.
What I mean by that is that I do not believe that fines are used as a deterrent, but as a punishment.

A speeding ticket (at least the ones I've gotten), is not a deterrent against future speeding, but a punishment in place of a court hearing for a crime already committed.

While they appear quite similar, you can regulate a punishment but you cannot regulate a deterrent, for one simple reason: you cannot regulate how much someone values something. To deter someone you have to know what's valuable to that person and how can you assess that? You say that a rich person should be fined a greater amount because of the decreased value that he places on an arbitrary amount of money. This is true, for some rich people, but not for all. Most wealthy people that I know love their money and place a higher value on it than I do. Should I be fined more? I love my schooling and knowledge. If I speed, will I be forced to drop a class? As a deterrent, a sliding fine scale doesn't work.


Anyways, that was a round about way of explaining this: justice must be blind. It must assess what has been done and punish what has been done, regardless of who did it. Despite being poor, I am against rich people getting fined more for committing the same crimes, much as I'm against people of other ethnicities getting harsher jail sentences or famous people getting easier sentences for like crimes. Any sentencing that takes into account the individual is no longer just.
 

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I didn't realize there was a link, haha. But now that I've read it I have a different understanding: he was arrested... and that's it. His punishment could include up to 6 months jail OR a petty fine. Not the phrase 'up to.' He won't see a maximum sentence and he sure as hell won't see jail time. He was probably released on his own recognizance after being booked if he even got that far. Who knows how the Japanese do it.

Here is something many people don't know. From time to time I cause to be issued a civil bench warrant for someone's arrest. The picture in your mind are two police officers visiting you at home, putting you in hand cuffs, and driving you to the police station then letting you sit in jail for 48 hours or until charges are brought. What actually happens are one of two things: the police visit you, tell you you are under arrest, then release you on the spot if you promise to appear at court, or they mail you a letter saying you are to appear at court on a certain date. Yeah, that's it.

I the doctor will see similar treatment.
Things are a little different in Japan. The presumption of innocence that is present in most countries with British based law (USA, Canada, most of the Caribbean) is not present there. Further, the courts have a 99%+ conviction rate. The most likely scenario is his defence lawyer will advise him to plead guilty so as not to aggravate the police/prosecutors. It's an interesting contrast to our systems of law.
 

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Things are a little different in Japan. The presumption of innocence that is present in most countries with British based law (USA, Canada, most of the Caribbean) is not present there. Further, the courts have a 99%+ conviction rate. The most likely scenario is his defence lawyer will advise him to plead guilty so as not to aggravate the police/prosecutors. It's an interesting contrast to our systems of law.
Interesting. I should play some Phoenix Wright to educate myself about Japanese court. :lol:
 
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