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This is a good question. You must disassemble, i.e. remove the spring, and then test the damper manually for compression and rebound. A good shock will be difficult to compress by hand, and it will want to return to its extended position. A shot shock will just collapse when you compress it, and stay there. Obviously there are various gradations in between the two extremes, but they are difficult to test without specialized machinery. Compare the four shocks. They should all feel about the same. If you can feel big differences between them, then something is not right.
 

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One time I compared shocks by setting each in a vise, then hanging a weight off the top, and timing how long it took for them to compress. That's how I figured out that the Sportivo shocks were sh*t.
To be fair, the Sportivo struts weren't all that great to start with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Taking MerryFrankster's suggestion, I compressed the struts and timed how long it took for them to rebound. My arm dyno told me all struts compressed about the same - not scientific, but good enough to know if any one strut stands out. The struts that were in the rear took about 5 seconds to rebound. The struts that were in the front took nearly 10 seconds. Side-to-side, the struts rebounded in exactly the same amount of time. Unfortunately, I could not test my hypothesis that strut rebound settings might account for the difference front to rear because I no longer possess the tool to adjust rebound.
 

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Having just done 4 struts on the spidey I will chime in.

As far as timing the automatic rebound that just shows there is still a gas charge in them.

I had one on the back of this spider that appeared perfectly fine. However when compressing then pulling it out and recompressing there was a hollow undampened spot where it would jump/travel about an inch.

Think what the strut does over a bump. Rapidly compresses, extends via the spring, then compresses once again.

There needs to be adequate dampening when changing between compression and rebound cycles. Not just travening in either direction. I have seen alot of worn struts that appear good in one direction or the other, but when changing directions the dampening lags one way or the other. The next step is a locked up strut, or a leak that will eventually offer no dampening whatsoever.
 
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