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Post is about exactly what it says. I'll be outlining how to clean out the dc motor side of the power steering motor.

Why: overtime, the commutator and brushes in the motor wear down and burnt up copper starts coating everything. Kind of like what happens in the bell housing as the clutch wears out. This powder causes higher heat retention and increased resistance in the motor. Eventually, the motor either gets so hot or is pulling so much power that the ecu refuses to turn it on and you get the P/S light, code 21, 22, or 23, and the power steering stops working. However, the scope of this post is not to diagnose your power steering issue, it is to resolve what is sometimes a cause of one.

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First, empty the resevoir with a turkey baster or something. There is a lot more in there than you think. Remove as much as possible to make your life easier.

2nd, undo the 3 electrical connections. You just squeeze em and tap them ofd with a screw driver from above if they are tight. Easy. When putting back together use some dielectric grease on the terminals if that's your speed.

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I know the above pic is already out of the car but its a good view that you dont have while it is in. Maybe this will help you.

3rd, Undo the high pressure refill line. Its just a metal clip and a pressure fit. Pull off the tube. Then, unscrew the high pressure output line (the metal one that is screwed in, pictured below bottom right. i dont know the size, i just used a spanner. stufd will leak out so have some rags handy.
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4th: look back at the first above view image. See the 3 attachment points? They are all 12mm. I used a ratchet with an extension to remove each one. One of them is a nut on a stud while the other 2 are bolts. When moving the nut, pickuo the washer under it too. If you forget to, when you pull the pump you may lose the washer and then you wont compress the bushing right on reinstallation. At this point, the pump should be free. Take it out and lets continue.

View attachment 75118 See this black cylinder in the image above? That's what we are removing. 3 small bolts and its off. If there isn't hot glue on one of the bolts, its prob been opened before. Nothing with this systwm is torqued to tight so should be easy. When the bolts are off, you may feel the cylinder is stuck. It isn't. There are strong magnets holding it un place. Just hold the cast base of the pump with one hand and pull really hard with the other. There is a circular waffle spring thingy that may fall out. DO NOT LOSE IT. If you don't see it, look into the cylinder you just pulled off. It should be sitting in an indentation at the end. If it isn't, but is instead sticking to a magnet, we're gonna have a little fun later.

For this next part, I highly suggest you wear an N95 or greater mask and safety glasses. Do what you will but just understand that metals and your lungs are like that catholic school dance. Leave room for the holy spirit or you're gonna get beat. You've been warned.

I have a video of me doing this next part but I don't feel like figuring out how to post it. Just take a compressed air can or use an air comoressor and blow out the motor assembly and cap (black cylinder). Dust will fly everywhere. This is burnt up copper among other things. I suggest you do this outside in a well ventilated area. Blow out the wire loom. Most importantly though, blow out the base where the spindle meets the rest of the motor/pump. This is where the commutator and brushes are located. Get all the dust out. Make suree all the spings down there are in place.
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Now, let ready for reassembly! Put a light coat of grease on the bearing at the end of the spindle. Its the one you can easily access so dont think too hard. I used some random black synthetic shit i had laying around in a jar. When i say light, i mean barely any than wipe off. Should see any but there should be residue. Now, find that waffle spring if it isnt already in its home. If it is out of place, take a dab of silicone black rtv and smoosh it back into its home. Kind of challenging if you have swole rock climber hands like me that dont fit into tight places. Now, either let it cure and put the cylinder cap back on tomorrow, or use some finesse.
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See the circular indentation at the bottom? That's where the circle waffle spring thing goes. You have to gook it in place or it will fly out of place as you put the cylinder back on over the rest of the assembly. I didnt wait and i put it back together by very firmly holding the motor with one hand and very firmly maintainung control of the cap with the magnets as i slid it over. If you bump it, the spring will come out of place and you have to start over. Also, before i reassembled, i greased and cleaned the ring gasket and i sanded and cleaned the mating surfaces. I also sprayed out the magnets with electronic cleaner and let it flash off. Also, i'm not sure, but mark which holes go where before disassembly because the cap might only go back on one way.

Torque the bolts back on in a triangle pattern (lol) and use loctite. They werent tight when i took em off so i didnt go wild putting em back on.

Go back to your car and reassemble. Leave the pressurized return line off. Its the one that is held on with a clip and is rubber. Not the metal hose. Shove a bleeder line into the house and put the clip over. Make sure its tight or it will blowout. My bleeder pvc tube was too small so i used teflon i had laying around to make it fat and tight. Do this or you will be sad when fluid goes everywhere.
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Now, using your fluid of cjoice, fill up the resevoir to the cold max line. Im not here to debagte fluids, you can research that. I used pentosin chf11s but most people are now reccomending nissan hydro electric power steering fluid. Theres a whole thread where a bunch of sampleas of diff fluids were sent to blackstone so read to your hearts content. Also, dont believe any fluid reccs from the dealer. The parts dep i talked to refused to ak owledge that toyora ever used different power steering fluid and refused to look it up under the mr2 in the system, basically callung me misinformed and telling me to pound sand. I was very polite too smh. Anyways, figure out what fluix you want to use. Napa had the pentosin in stock so i used it. 28 for a liter. Dont spill any fool.

Plug the plastic stem the return line goes on before filling the fluid btw. Put the bleeder line into a bucket to catch the gook. Jack the front wheels of the cae off the ground. I put the fronr on stands and chocked the back wheels+ parking break. Make sure the wheels can spin freely without touching the ground.

Now, I want you to stand out of your car, staring at the resevoir, while starting the car. In a few second, the resevoir will drop. Stop the car, top it off, repear. DO NOT let it suck air unless you want to buy more fluid. Now, with the car off, do the same thing while turning the wheel all the way back in forth a few times. Make sure to continually top off the fluid to the cold max line.

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When all the fluid coming out is new fluid and youve purged the air and dont feel like doing anymore cus you ran ojt of fluid, make sure that the fluid is filled to the halfway between cold mind and max. Baste out extra is needed. Put the return line back on the plastic stem and clean up. You are done. Put the car back on the ground and test drive, stopping to check for leaks. If the steering feel is soft or inconsistent or doesnt track right, you have air in the lines. Repeat steps with fresh fluid, making sure to not let the resevoir run dry.

If you couldn't bleed the system, aka the pump didnt turn on, something else is wrong. Good luck. Forgive the spelling issues and dropped letters.i ttped this up on mobile.
 

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I have been meaning to do this for a few months now.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have been meaning to do this for a few months now.
It was pretty easy. The hardest part was the bleeding procedure and finding the fluid. I don't think its a bad idea to do as preventative maintenance. I did it because i was driving yesterday when all of a sudden my power steering went out. You might as well get it out of the way.
 

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Did you do any refurbishment on the brushes and commutator? The brushes are expendables, but historically commutators could be turned on a lathe to restore them if they were too worn to serve. Don't know if that is still possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #6

  1. Did you do any refurbishment on the brushes and commutator? The brushes are expendables, but historically commutators could be turned on a lathe to restore them if they were too worn to serve. Don't know if that is still possible.
I did not service the commutator or brushes, other than just blowing off carbon/ copper dust. You could definitely pull the spindle assembly and turn or sand the commutator in the direction of brush travel. Also, I see no reason why you couldn't swap out the brushes. I just did not have the tools to pull the spindle or the time to mess with it, this being my daily. However, turning the commutator and replacing the brushes would definitely increase the amount of seevice time from this fix. You could also probably find a machinist who services dc motors to do this in the 1-200 dollar range if you just gave him the spindle, maybe for even less.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
if the commutator is round, you wouldn't technically HAVE to lathe them even in there are grooves in it. it's when t's not in round where turning it may be advantageous
Also, if there is a lot of buildup on the surface of the commutator, you could expose a surface with lower resistance by turning it, even if it is still round couldn't you? I'm no expert though, just read a lot and sometimes do stuff like this. Also, I've been told that if you are getting a commutator serviced you ahould also get the mica that is in the slots cut so the distance between the commutator surface and mica surface is in spec
 

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... if you are getting a commutator serviced you ahould also get the mica that is in the slots cut so the distance between the commutator surface and mica surface is in spec
Right, because the mica is so hard that it needs relief from the brushes. I wonder if they still use mica. My father was an electrician, and I learned about this from his books. He died 56 years ago.
 

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Also, if there is a lot of buildup on the surface of the commutator, you could expose a surface with lower resistance by turning it, even if it is still round couldn't you? I'm no expert though, just read a lot and sometimes do stuff like this. Also, I've been told that if you are getting a commutator serviced you ahould also get the mica that is in the slots cut so the distance between the commutator surface and mica surface is in spec
yes you could by refreshing the surface, but you can do that with a drill and a fine grit strip (1000) to just remove the surface oxidation

turning the copper down to the lowest point of the grooves though will reduce the thickness of the copper, so it will lessen the life of the commutator if the brushes dig grooves again.
 

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It was pretty easy. The hardest part was the bleeding procedure and finding the fluid. I don't think its a bad idea to do as preventative maintenance. I did it because i was driving yesterday when all of a sudden my power steering went out. You might as well get it out of the way.
I don't expect it to be a problem other than rust. I have the Toyota $$ fluid just waiting to be used. I think its a good preventive maintenance procedure. New brushes/turned armature would be nice but I like to drive it daily.
 

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I read this tutorial and decided to take it apart. Upon examination I see there are some fluid inside the Housing (some at the bottom where the waffle washer sits..) is this normal??
 

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My ps still doesn’t work. Could it be the relay? I heard this wining noise and the ps light is on intermittently. Regardless, still no ps...
 

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There should not be any fluid on the motor side of the pump. Just magnets, armature and brushes - all dry. If your motor is whining I would say it must be getting power, so no reason to suspect a bad relay.
 

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The unit contains an electronic controller which can fail. I understand that it has embedded diagnostics, although I have no idea how to read them out.
 

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If you had the electric motor housing off, it is possible to get it back in the wrong rotational relationship to the pump. In one position, the pump will run backwards and pump the oil into the reservoir and make a fine mess. Spin it 120 deg in another position, it will run, but very slowly and will get very hot, very quickly and have almost no pressure. If the motor overheats, the PS light will come on.

Don't ask how I know :rolleyes:

You should mark the pump and motor to make sure the motor housing goes back exactly the same as it came off.

In any case, you shouldn't have any oil in the electric motor. To diagnose the PS light, you will need the shop manual at the very least
 

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Does anyone know if it's possible to spin the pump without starting the car? A running engine with a vehicle on jack stands makes me a bit nervous... :unsure:🚑
 

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From the service manual on how to bleed in case anyone is interested.

POWER STEERING FLUID BLEEDING

1. CHECK FLUID LEVEL
2. JACK UP FRONT OF VEHICLE AND SUPPORT IT WITH STANDS
3. TURN STEERING WHEEL With the engine stopped, turn the steering wheel slowly from lock to lock several times.
4. LOWER VEHICLE
5. START ENGINE Run the engine at idle for a few minutes.
6. TURN STEERING WHEEL (a) With the engine idling, turn the steering wheel to left or right full lock position and keep it there for 2–3 seconds, then turn the steering wheel to the opposite full lock position and keep it there for 2–3 seconds. (b) Repeat (a) several times.
7. STOP ENGINE
8. CHECK FOR FOAMING OR EMULSIFICATION If the system has to be bled twice specifically because of foaming or emulsification, check for fluid leaks in the system.
9. CHECK FLUID LEVEL
 
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