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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
DISCLAIMER: Removing an airbag is not recommended by me, Spyderchat , Toyota, or probably even your own personal God. You do so at your own risk.


Job Difficulty: I'll do the beers scale out of 5 and give this a 2. The job itself is not particularly difficult but there's a bit of danger involved, some fiddling with obnoxious parts, and having to rent a tool. You can do this though.


Necessary Tool List:
-10mm socket or box wrench for battery lead
-Torx T-30 bit or screwdriver
-(optional but advantageous) power drill for above bit
-flashlight
-Needlenose pliers
-Steering wheel puller (rent or buy) (this will likely require some SAE size sockets, but all are different)
-19mm socket and large extension
-blue loc-tite (optional)
-(maybe) 8.8 metric bolts to supplement steering wheel puller

Installed Parts:
-Sparco Faster (any wheel should work just the same)
-Splash Boss hub...this is available only from the link below.

http://www.more-japan.com/product.php?productid=17426&cat=658&page=2

It's costly, yes, but it's the only one that comes with all you need to regain stock-like functionality. Be aware that recieving it can take 2 to 6 weeks!



Let's go!



Step 1: Disconnect the hot lead from the car's battery a good 20 minutes or so before even messing with anything. You're going to be working intimately with an airbag that you definitely do not want blowing up in your face. The best offense is a good defense, they say. Sorry, no pictures for this...if you're already unsure at this point, then just step away.

Step 2: Take a look at the body of the steering wheel, particularly at about 8:30 and 3:30 positions just behind the grips. You'll see a hole on either side with screws peeking out from inside.



That is a Torx T-30 bit, sorry about the dust making it hard to see. These 2 screws are the only thing holding the center airbag section of the wheel. Once removed, the center will essentially fall out of the wheel. But...before we get there...

These screws are going to be a bit of a pain. I used a power drill that just barely fit in the space provided to loosen them. Tip: While unscrewing, hold the airbag with your other hand and pull it with moderate pressure towards the back of the car. This will prevent the horn from going off and scaring the hell out of you. This part should go smoothly.

However, Toyota didn't want these just falling out. Rather, even after being completely loosened and disconnected from anything, these screws will want to hang in their spots preventing you from moving forward. This is mostly due to little tabs on the opening you were looking through to find the screw. After some poking and prodding, I finally had success with a set of needlenose pliers. Just grab the screwhead any way you can and pull hard. Eventually, it should fall out of it's perch. You only need to get one, and then pull the center section of the steering wheel out. The other will fall out of place.

Step 3: As you're pulling the airbag out of the wheel, you're going to encounter resistance from a lone wire harness (the big yellow one in the pic). Remove this harness by simply pushing the visible tab on the top forward, toward the frunk if being held as shown. Should be very easy to do.




Step 4: Your airbag will now be fully disconnected and can be put aside. Store this face up (Toyota badge up) because if you don't and it goes off, it'll become a missile. Below is what you'll be looking at. Before we pull the wheel off, we're going to disconnect the smaller yellow wire (in a U shape) in the upper right. I believe this is going to be the horn. Just pull it off it's little connecter thing on the right side.

It's also time to grab a 19mm socket, an extension, and a socket wrench to undo that big nut in the middle that holds the wheel on. It's on there pretty good but it shouldn't take an absurd amount of force. Engaging the steering wheel lock will make this job easier. Do not fully remove this nut yet, just get it away from the wheel.





Step 5: Our wheel is press fit onto the shaft so it won't be a matter of simply removing the wheel. You'll need a steering wheel/gear puller. These can be rented from your local Autozone for about $20 deposit. Fortunately, our wheel already has drilled and tapped holes in it ready for this tool. Unfortunately though, it will likely only include SAE bolts...and we need metric. I found the right bolts at a hardware store, they are 8.8 metric, which I guess designates the width of the thread.

Here are the holes with the puller bolts installed.



Step 6: Here you can see the puller fully assembled and installed. It's a pretty simple system, with the center bolt pressing against the steering shaft and the two outer bolts gripping the wheel. As you tighten that center bolt, it pulls the wheel with ever greater pressure until the wheel pops off. Make sure your steering wheel and tires are perfectly straight before proceeding because this is the last time we can adjust that. Now, we use the puller, pop, and we can fully remove that 19mm nut and slide the wheel off.





Step 7: Now that the wheel is off, go ahead and set it aside. Below is what you'll be looking at, and it should look exactly like this if you took care not to turn the wheel while pulling. The big black round thing rotates, making it possible for the electrical connections to work regardless of how the wheel is oriented.




Step 8: Now we'll take a look at our hub. We get the hub itself, a cover, hardware for wheel install, and a bunch of wires. Your instructions are Japanese so we're at this alone. Eventually, you'll discover that 2 of these wire sets are necessary and the other 2 are redundant, included in case the other 2 won't work with your application. The 2 on the left are for cancelling the airbag, and the two on the right are for the horn.

For the bag, we'll be using the wire set on the top left with the yellow connector. For the horn, we'll be using the wire set on the inner right with the smaller white connector and 2 black wires.





Step 9: We'll start by replacing our horn. I've identified the connecter you'll need to remove. It's a simple clip. Our new one fits right in place as if it were stock.



Now, go ahead and snap your airbag cancel assembly onto the yellow connector that we disconnected from the stock airbag earlier. Yellow to yellow, snaps right in. Here's what we'll be looking at when done.




Step 10: Alright, now it's time to install the hub. This is simple, as we just press it onto the spline that the steering wheel used to be on. Notice in the picture that the front of the hub has a little arrow at about the 1 o clock position in the picture. When sliding the hub on initially, that arrow should be pointing straight up because your steering shaft should be aligned to dead center from before.

....HOWEVER, I have already tightened our 19mm nut back down to secure the hub in this picture. I used the steering lock to hold the hub for me while I torqued. Once the hub is on the steering shaft, it is OK if you turn the shaft while tightening the nut.




Step 11: Now we're going to install our hub cover. Before doing so, run your two horn wires through the cutout in the hub and into the center as shown in the picture below. Once done, the cover will just slide right on and is a perfect fit. Just tuck all that airbag wire stuff in there somewhere.





Step 12: Finally, the fun part. Time to put the wheel on. Remember here, that the steering wheel should go on such that the arrow on the hub is aligned with the top center of the wheel. This may mean having to put the wheel on crooked as shown below. But, obviously when we turn the car on and straighten the wheel, it should be perfect as we've taken care to get this alignment right.

Just line the wheel up and screw it on with the included allen key and small screws. You may want to use a tiny dab of blue loc-tite on these screws when you're all finished. They can't be torqued very hard. I would recommend finishing the install first though, and making sure the wheel is aligned properly when done. If a drive confirms that it is, just remove these screws once more and then do the loc-tite.





Step 13: Almost there. Just gotta connect our horn. As you can see, the button assembly has 2 male connectors on it. One is connected to some metal that goes into the center of the assembly and appears to connect with the button itself. The other is just kinda hanging out.

To figure out which wire goes where, reconnect your battery if you haven't already. Touch the end of each wire to the metal of the hub. 1 of them will make the horn go off. This is our man, and he's going to go with our center-attached connection on the button assembly. The button essentially makes that ground connection which caused the horn to fire before. Attach the other wire to the other connector on the button assembly. Go ahead and test it.





Step 14: Press your horn button into the slot, install whatever horn button garnish you want, turn the key, reset your steering wheel to center....and Viola! You're done

...probably. Take a test drive and make sure the wheel alignment is right. If not, you'll make the necessary alignment adjustments by removing the wheel, and then the hub. Realign the hub on the steering shaft spline with the arrow further to the left or right depending on where your wheel was when the car went straight. You won't be able to just pull off the hub with your hands. Use your socket extension as a pry bar, by putting it through the hole in the side of the hub, and resting on the steering shaft spline. Pry towards you...it will pop off. This should be pretty easy now that you've got the hang of what we're doing.



 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Just the regular 6 point star pattern. Honeslty, I'm not totally sure those bolts aren't actually the much rarer Polydrive pattern just by looking at them...but Torx T-30 worked perfectly anyway. So, we're calling it that.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
This is going to be the Works Bell Splash Boss hub. I'm doing a writeup with it because, first, the pics don't work on that one. But, more importantly, because this is the only hub we know of that allows airbag light cancel, turn signal cancel, and horn function right out of the box with no modification. Shouldn't be any of that funky resistor or fabrication stuff happening here.

Obviously you'll see more of that tomorrow, and so will I.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It's barely any smaller, I'm sure they'll both "work". T-30 seems to be the standard size judging from some other how-to's on the web, and it worked here.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
All done. Kinda sucked, but it wasn't that bad. You really can't complain about a job that allows you to sit in the driver's seat while working. Hopefully at least one person out there will be inspired.

Might take a few better install pics later, but it's night and the light won't be right for a while.
 

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great write up. thanks. your center garnish looks great is that from christopherathens?

hadn't really thought about this mod but yours looks so good............hmm
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks. This is the xdesign steering wheel badge from way, way back. Our steering wheel T appears to be exactly the same size as the Sparco horn button, so I imagine that any steering wheel badge should work. Of course, every wheel comes with it's own horn button garnish anyway so it's not a necessity. I just wanted that stock-ish feel.
 

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Green dots green dots!!! Thats a fat wheel. How dring with it?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Green dots green dots!!! Thats a fat wheel. How dring with it?
Well, I can't really say too much. It's been snowing here for the last few days, probably about 9 inches now. The roads were clear enough for me to go a few blocks to check the steering alignment but I won't be able to really put it to the test for at least another few days if this blizzard stops.

But, the wheel itself feels great (it better for $320 !). It's got a really solid, hefty feel, with just a touch of softness to the grip. Very "Porsche-like" in my imagination. Turning is also a little weird at first because it takes less rotation to get the same turn, should be good for the country runs.

I will say, this wheel is 330mm in diameter. Unless you want a really, really small wheel I wouldnt go any smaller than this. It looks good, but it's just on the edge of looking and feeling too small.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Fattest one they make, or so they say. Also one of the most expensive, unfortunately. Should be about $320 from most sources.
 

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All done. Kinda sucked, but it wasn't that bad. You really can't complain about a job that allows you to sit in the driver's seat while working. Hopefully at least one person out there will be inspired.

Might take a few better install pics later, but it's night and the light won't be right for a while.
will you marry me and do all the mods on the spyder i hope to get soon? oh wait! my wife might have a problem with that plan. dang. wow what a great write up and soo perfect for someone like myself with little confidence. i would do this now. thanks!
 

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nice write-up..good job..i just gave you an imaginary vitual green dot.
 
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