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I can't guarantee that this will work for everyone. I got rid of the flickering problem, which is what most of us are experiencing. I found out about this by accident. As soon as I can gather all the info on the parts just go to Amazon and get it. I estimate it will be about 50-60 bucks altogether. So there I think I typed enuf for now until I research he parts.
 

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Ok parts list, Katur 9005/HB3 LED bulbs (no fans on these) 17 bucks. canbus Hikari LED Conversion kit 9012/9005/9006 20 bucks. The bus stops the high beams from flickering, but it won't light up in DRL mode. So, in order to light up in DRL mode, after you put the car in gear, turn on the lights and flash the high beams, and it should stay on. I only discovered this phenomenon this past week. When I first installed the bulbs, the DRLs would not light up. So I went a month, thinking as long as I have high beams when I need it, I didn't mind the DRLs not lighting up, since the halogens look so wimpy. BTW, my main headlamps are halogens. So good luck in your endeavor. The good thing is that you can send it back right away. I have tried 5 different bulbs until I finally settled on this one. So, happy trails my fellow Spyder junkies.
 

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You're probably right. My opinion is it would not be appropriate if there is no ambient lighting to diffuse the glare. But looking at the modern vehicles with LED DRLs they are rather bright as well in my humble opinion.
 

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So to the folks out there it's your call. As long as the cops leave me alone with it, no complaints here, or if someone where to flash their lights as my beams are too bright I will gladly comply. I can switch those lights on or off at will, at least I have another option.
 

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Modern LED DRLs are quite bright. But they have no distance, drop off is quick. High beams need to have range past half a mile. But I've seen plenty of people running full brightness LED high beams during the day and it's quite painful. Try standing in front of your car and crouch down a little. Might be an issue. Might not.
 

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Hey Halo I always appreciate and respect your input and contributions to this site. You and Cyclehead are the best out there in Spyder land and forgive me for not mentioning other great bloggers on this site and their contributions to the conversations. I look at other LED vehicles and some are very bright and others not so much. I thinks it's all subjective in terms on what you think might be a hazard to yourself and other drivers. After your comments I did take a few steps back (maybe 50 feet +- and looked at it pointing in the direction of the Sun about 8 am) I looked at it standing up a bit of glare but not too much. I will do another test sitting in another car maybe a 100 feet out and see how that looks. I don't want to blind anyone driving, but I think whatever is out there is rather bright as well. It's all subjective, and unless there is some standardization on the amount of glare the devices emit relative to ambient light conditions. I will take it for what it's worth right now and at least have the option to use the feature as I see fit for the circumstances at hand. And thanks Halo for your input, always right on, and appreciate it.
 

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It's definitely subjective. I of course say everything with respect and love that you're looking into things.

There IS standardization on how much "glare" DRLs can produce. FMVSS 108. But... whether manufacturers stick with it is iffy. It's not a test manufacturers have to PASS, it's just guidelines with an honor system basically. So there are surely many headlights that are horribly out of spec. IIHS has been rating headlights for some time now, which is awesome. Combats this lax behavior on the manufacturer's side.

If you believe your headlights to be safe in DRL mode, while also providing enough light as a high beam at night, keep it!
 

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Thank you Halo for sharing a lot of factual information that we can use at our disposal. My wish is that there are many more of you and your wisdom that we can share amongst ourselves to edify one another with knowledge.
 

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If someone wants to get a read on the voltage at the connector in DRL mode that might give some more useful information as to how to approach. There may be a simple way to convert the voltage to PWM instead relatively simply and cheaply. I’m just spitballing but “dimmable” household LED bulbs have to include that circuitry because IIRC that’s how classic dimmer switches work.

Edit: I got ahead of myself- it’s been a long time since I’ve done much electrical engineering and I’m very rusty. It’s hard to believe that they would have used voltage as recently as the early 2000s, AFAIK even then PWM would have been either simpler or more efficient.
 

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So it's interesting you bring that up. I was in talks with XenonDepot when they were building their DRL module for the XtremeLED bulbs. They found it shockingly difficult to make basic PWM work with their drivers. Most cars use PWM for DRLs. That's why it only really works with some Toyotas and similar systems and isn't quite universal.

However you ARE right, the MR2 Spyder seems to use low voltage instead of PWM. That driver is not compatible with that. A new driver would have to be created that detects a low voltage mode while still being able to run itself (drivers have like a 6-30V range for ones that work with 24V systems), then use PWM on the bulb to create a low brightness mode. Hopefully, the chips can support a low brightness mode, some cannot (not a problem with the XD bulbs though). Using XD's DRL module, the lights simply don't turn on when tested on an 03 Spyder.

Just some interesting info. The sad thing is so few vehicles use voltage, that it wouldn't be economical to create a new module just for us.
 

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I'm a "do unto others" guy. What does that mean? I hate being blinded either from the front or the rear by either improperly installed or incompatible lighting systems. People who put HIDs or LEDs into reflector systems to me have not made the best decision and have probably hurt their night visibility. The light is now more scattered rather than focused and is only serving to blind oncoming traffic while adding no benefit to the driver.

I found in Virginia that changing anything from factory is illegal and if the state inspector is being picky, can result in a failed inspection. All lighting has to be DOT approved, a federal regulation that is stamped on the part. My last inspection (not on my MR2) failed because of an installed HID projection lamp system and LED license plate lights. Matter of fact, if you read the packaging on LED lights from the auto parts store, they are marked, "For off-road use only". If it ain't factory, it ain't legal in Virginia. So the bureaucracy made my car less safe by having headlights that didn't illuminate down the road as far and make my plate more easily visible to law enforcement.

BTW - the only reason I installed the HID system was because my driver's side low-beam would burn out on an annual basis and replacing it required the front bumper to be removed. Not to mention the $20-$40 cost of a bulb depending on which one. I have yet to have a failure of the HID system which was re-installed after yet another halogen bulb burned out after I had to convert the system back to factory to pass inspection.
 

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I'm a "do unto others" guy. What does that mean? I hate being blinded either from the front or the rear by either improperly installed or incompatible lighting systems. People who put HIDs or LEDs into reflector systems to me have not made the best decision and have probably hurt their night visibility. The light is now more scattered rather than focused and is only serving to blind oncoming traffic while adding no benefit to the driver.

I found in Virginia that changing anything from factory is illegal and if the state inspector is being picky, can result in a failed inspection. All lighting has to be DOT approved, a federal regulation that is stamped on the part. My last inspection (not on my MR2) failed because of an installed HID projection lamp system and LED license plate lights. Matter of fact, if you read the packaging on LED lights from the auto parts store, they are marked, "For off-road use only". If it ain't factory, it ain't legal in Virginia. So the bureaucracy made my car less safe by having headlights that didn't illuminate down the road as far and make my plate more easily visible to law enforcement.

BTW - the only reason I installed the HID system was because my driver's side low-beam would burn out on an annual basis and replacing it required the front bumper to be removed. Not to mention the $20-$40 cost of a bulb depending on which one. I have yet to have a failure of the HID system which was re-installed after yet another halogen bulb burned out after I had to convert the system back to factory to pass inspection.
I hope CA doesn't go the way of VA and HI. We have enuf problems with the smog police here. Yes, I have to agree with you to some extent. But if I am blinded by other cars, at least I have the option to do it or not (turn on my DRL/HB).
 

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So it's interesting you bring that up. I was in talks with XenonDepot when they were building their DRL module for the XtremeLED bulbs. They found it shockingly difficult to make basic PWM work with their drivers. Most cars use PWM for DRLs. That's why it only really works with some Toyotas and similar systems and isn't quite universal.

However you ARE right, the MR2 Spyder seems to use low voltage instead of PWM. That driver is not compatible with that. A new driver would have to be created that detects a low voltage mode while still being able to run itself (drivers have like a 6-30V range for ones that work with 24V systems), then use PWM on the bulb to create a low brightness mode. Hopefully, the chips can support a low brightness mode, some cannot (not a problem with the XD bulbs though). Using XD's DRL module, the lights simply don't turn on when tested on an 03 Spyder.

Just some interesting info. The sad thing is so few vehicles use voltage, that it wouldn't be economical to create a new module just for us.
The power of economy of scale.
 

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So it's interesting you bring that up. I was in talks with XenonDepot when they were building their DRL module for the XtremeLED bulbs. They found it shockingly difficult to make basic PWM work with their drivers. Most cars use PWM for DRLs. That's why it only really works with some Toyotas and similar systems and isn't quite universal.

However you ARE right, the MR2 Spyder seems to use low voltage instead of PWM. That driver is not compatible with that. A new driver would have to be created that detects a low voltage mode while still being able to run itself (drivers have like a 6-30V range for ones that work with 24V systems), then use PWM on the bulb to create a low brightness mode. Hopefully, the chips can support a low brightness mode, some cannot (not a problem with the XD bulbs though). Using XD's DRL module, the lights simply don't turn on when tested on an 03 Spyder.

Just some interesting info. The sad thing is so few vehicles use voltage, that it wouldn't be economical to create a new module just for us.
Forgive my ignorance, but what's PWM?
 

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Any modifications at all to your lighting system make your lamps not DOT compliant. Yes, it's illegal. It's just a risk we have to balance by trying to keep it functional and OEM-ish, ideally.

PWM is pulse width modulation like Tim said. Quick pulses of full 12V power in this case, to a halogen bulb will make it glow dimmer than if it was getting constant 12V. Adjust pulse length and delay to change brightness. LEDs cannot take changes in voltage as well as incandescent bulbs, so they're always controlled by PWM.
 

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So, the capacitor acts as a smoothing "mechanism" to modulate the pulses. The "smoothing" is what stops the flickering problem. Thanks for spelling out PWM.
 
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