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As an MR2 Spyder newbie, I managed to dent my 2001's rocker panel :chargrined:---even though I had the jack mounted at the perforated area--- when I tried to lift the car (high enough so that I could roll around under the car with my mechanic's crawler) with my floor jack.

So here are my important question: when using a floor jack to lift my car, where should I put the head of the floor jack; once I have the car jacked up, where are the best places to install the jack stands, so that I can both move around under the car and not bend any of the panels and frame?

A simple diagram showing the proper lift/jack stand locations would be wonderful!

Thanks In Advance!


Paul
 

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For the rear, I always put the floor jack under the aft engine mount on the crossmember. There's a flat piece of metal that's part of the mount, perfect for the floor jack. For the front, there is a "U" shaped pattern embossed in the plastic belly fairing. That's the jack point for the front end. I never liked the side jacking points in the sheetmetal pinch welds. The sheetmetal is so thin. Owners manual says it's okay to lift where the pinch weld is marked - with two half moon cutouts. The repair manual schematic for lift points is not much help. I may be able to find it somewhere.
 

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I would jack up the car 2 wheels at a time front and rear as per cyclehead above. Then put jack stands on the pinch welds on each side of the car. I, too, have heard that jacking up on the pinch welds isn't the best idea (i.e. lifting only 1 wheel up with a jack)...

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So where does everyone believe the proper locations are when using a full vehicle "X" lift?
 

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Sorry to bring an old thread back to life, but I just gkt my spyder and will be lifting it tomorrow for the first time for a tire change.

I've spoke with the local shop and they are going to allow me to assist with the lifting because they know how anal I am haha!

Anyways, lifting by the engine mount in the rear and the designated spot between the tires in the front won't be a problem, but has anyone damaged their panels when lowering the car down on jack stands on the marked pinch welds?

Seen so many posts here of damage being done lifting from those points, but I haven't seen any people confirming its safe to lower down onto the points in question.

Tomorrow I'll be using a floor jack, but in the future I have access to a full hydraulic lift in a shop and was wondering if lifting at 4 points at same time creates concern as well?

Let me know. Thanks boys!
 

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It has been suggested to use wooden blocks or hockey pucks on the rail with a groove cut out to prevent bending the pinch welds. I usually just jack the car up like cyclehead noted and then slowly lower onto jack stands. Depending on the jack stand, you could possibly damage the pinch welds. I haven't tried the block idea but with the groove lined up they would probably work better and be more stable than with only the regular jack stand head. I'll be trying this out the next time I raise my spyder up. I would just recommend taking your time and stopping if it looks like you might do damage.
 

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Short answer: no damage to panels from using the pinch welds.
Extended common sense answer: don’t use deep seating jack stands or there will be.

FWIW you can lift from the pinch welds without damaging them quite easily...use a hockey puck, block of wood, etc, in your jack to distribute the force a bit better. Some like to cut a slot in whatever they choose to accommodate the pinch weld. I use a plain old hockey puck and it works without a problem.
 
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QuickJack sells a nice set of big rubber blocks for using with pinch welds. They're not cheap ($85 + shipping) but they work very well. They give you some extra lift so you have more room under the car, too. You can also get rubber caps for some jack stands.

Cutting slots in hockey pucks is pretty tough. I got decent results with a narrow wood chisel, just be careful. It's very hard rubber. Milling machine would be better.



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This is what I use. The round piece is self-centering around the rail and the square piece bears the weight of the car and doesn’t put any weight on the rails. I got the idea from the stock jack. If you look closely, the stock jack doesn’t bear any weight on the rails but just inside rails. I believe the slot is for stability and proper placement. I also made a special crossbar for the jackstands.
 

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QuickJack sells a nice set of big rubber blocks for using with pinch welds. They're not cheap ($85 + shipping) but they work very well. They give you some extra lift so you have more room under the car, too. You can also get rubber caps for some jack stands.

Cutting slots in hockey pucks is pretty tough. I got decent results with a narrow wood chisel, just be careful. It's very hard rubber. Milling machine would be better.



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I used my electric circular saw. Measure depth of pinch weld, subtract 1cm, set saw to that depth, use a 1 foot 2x4 and nail into it [email protected] pieces to block the hockey puck. Then cut through the pieces/puck. This helps you keep your line, hold the puck and rip through. The width is 3 cuts. The other way is a simple hand saw holding puck in a vice, then chisel the center strip out.

I then put a piece of Velcro put one piece on the puck and one on the jack, that way it is easily accessed.
 

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QuickJack sells a nice set of big rubber blocks for using with pinch welds. They're not cheap ($85 + shipping) but they work very well. They give you some extra lift so you have more room under the car, too. You can also get rubber caps for some jack stands.

Cutting slots in hockey pucks is pretty tough. I got decent results with a narrow wood chisel, just be careful. It's very hard rubber. Milling machine would be better.



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I cut pinch weld rail slots in the rubber blocks of my QuickJack with a table saw and a wood-cutting blade. If you look at the design of the jack that comes with the car you will see that the weight of the car is meant to be taken on either side of the pinch weld area, not on the pinch itself. This is true of every modern car. That is why you should always use a hard-rubber slotted protector on a jack stand, lift, or floor jack. Even if you don't bend the pinch weld, not using a jack pad adapter will result in chipping off some of the paint from the pinch weld.
 

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This is what I use. The round piece is self-centering around the rail and the square piece bears the weight of the car and doesn’t put any weight on the rails. I got the idea from the stock jack. If you look closely, the stock jack doesn’t bear any weight on the rails but just inside rails. I believe the slot is for stability and proper placement. I also made a special crossbar for the jackstands.
Nice design; now cover it with a layer of rubber, like from an inner-tube
 

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Nice design; now cover it with a layer of rubber, like from an inner-tube
Maybe I could plastikote it? Or maybe it will be left stuck to the car?
so far though, I haven’t really noticed any damage left from using that to jack the car up since it works pretty well at centering itself so it doesn’t rub on the rails but ever so slightly then all the contact is made underneath the car. Is your suggestion to protect the paint or for better contact between the car and jack? I have considered with my crossbar, smooth metal sliding on smooth metal, might not be ideal for supporting the car but do you think if the rubber isn’t bonded in some way, it would add anything? I used the crossbar when pulling the transmission and it seemed pretty stable although I don’t completely trust in my design (I wouldn’t bet my life on it); that’s the reason behind the tire under the car and always have a jack placed somewhere under the car.
 

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Maybe I could plastikote it? Or maybe it will be left stuck to the car?
so far though, I haven’t really noticed any damage left from using that to jack the car up since it works pretty well at centering itself so it doesn’t rub on the rails but ever so slightly then all the contact is made underneath the car. Is your suggestion to protect the paint or for better contact between the car and jack? I have considered with my crossbar, smooth metal sliding on smooth metal, might not be ideal for supporting the car but do you think if the rubber isn’t bonded in some way, it would add anything? I used the crossbar when pulling the transmission and it seemed pretty stable although I don’t completely trust in my design (I wouldn’t bet my life on it); that’s the reason behind the tire under the car and always have a jack placed somewhere under the car.
Suggestion is made to protect the paint at the area of contact
 
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