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Sammy's Super Charged Super Swap (Rotrex)

This will be a log of my Rotrex build, In keeping with the trend first started here: http://spyderchat.com/forums/showthread.php?27839-Sammy-s-Swap Which was my 1ZZ to 2ZZ swap thread. I only managed to rack up about 20 miles on the swap before I was off to lovely Tikrit, Iraq for a year long study abroad program sponsored by everyone here. While there I decided I wanted to step it up a bit, and after a little research, decided to add Web3.0's Rotrex kit to my Spyder.

You can read all about the kit here: http://spyderchat.com/forums/showthread.php?32254-Rotrex-Kit

Since getting back, I have been feverishly working at getting the car transformed. I'm just now getting to a stopping point, and decided I should play a little catch up and post a build thread.

This thread will not be limited to just Rotrex specific modifications, as I am doing a whole lot more at the same time. It just seemed more practical to do all the work simultaneously, with the car on stands and half tore apart.

The Upgrades (over my previous mods discussed in first link:)
Lower mileage 2ZZ with Celica style IM
Piper Stage II Cams
TurboSmart Kompact dual port BOV
Custom IC tank by Corky
Custom Borla dual out stainless exhaust
Custom oil cooler w/ additional sandwich plate for sensors
Performance Division down pipe w/ racing cat, coated by Jet-Hot
Little Rocket 2zz swap header, coated by Jet-Hot
TRD Quick Shifter
Spherical bearing shifter bushings
Matrix C60 6-Speed w/ Euro Celica final ratio and TRD Helical LSD
ACT HDSS pressure plate and 6-puck sprung clutch
J&S 8-Channel Safeguard
Billet aluminum fuel rail w/ Marren damper
Aeromotive AFPR and return setup
Walbro 255lph pump
EBC slotted rotors
OE Hard Top
Urethane suspension bushings
Innovative motor mounts
Deka battery on Corky's Mount
And a myriad of other associated odds and ends....

Here's a simple diagram of the overall setup of the air, vacuum, and emissions lines.


1. The car was put on stands and stripped of its bumpers, plastics, engine lid, wheel liners, suspension links and of course engine and transmission. From there I wanted to clean up the engine bay, but without having a means of rolling it, I devised this:

Baby pool under the car, with the hose run in from outside. Several cans of engine degreaser and a lot of scrubbing had it looking very clean.

2. I then masked everything that I didn't want painted, and basically built a paint booth around the engine bay. I ordered a couple cans of color-matched (6R4) spray paint online, and commenced to painting my tired engine bay.

Now this wasn't a professional job, but it turned out pretty good in my opinion.

3. While the cross-member and suspension parts were out of the car, I took the opportunity to sand blast and paint each one. I was going to install new poly bushings from Twos-R-Us, so all the rubber bits were removed as well. I set up a paint booth in the lean-to, heated with a propane heater. Everything received several coats of semi-gloss black.


Here are several small parts (Corky's Deka mount, tensioner, fuel rail, Megan Raching Toe Rods, dipstick tube) after paint.


4. I already mentioned the new bushings. Dev's tool was used for 90% of these. I had to use a BFH and a few other mean looking tools for some of the OE rubber removal, but it worked out. In the process I discovered a torn ball joint on my front right lower control arm. I replaced it with a junkyard part off of a Scion xB (same part.)


5. While the wheels were off I also replaced a torn front right fenderliner, had my left front fender repainted, and installed some EBC slotted rotors. My old ones were previously turned down and paint wasn't keeping the rust at bay.


6. Since I had the freedom to work in an empty engine bay, I went ahead installed a number of other necessary items. To make the install clean, I picked up a nutsert (aka rivnut/rivet nut) to give me threaded mounts through sheetmetal. I used these all over the bay, mostly in M6-1.0 flavor. Here you can see the twin tank Saikou Michi oil catch can and Rotrex reservoir (also shown is one of four Innovative Engine Mounts):

The Saikou Michi cans are each custom made to the customer's specifications. I based these on a Lotus Elise catch can. The inlets/outlets and mount were modified at my request. The Rotrex oil reservoir comes with two mounts which I ditched in favor of a Moroso stainless T-Bolt clamp mount.

7. I had previously installed a MWR oil cooler, which had lines that leaked like a sieve. I would have to make new lines, but I also wanted to modify the mount. So I took the supplied aluminum mount, cut, bent, and drilled it to mount to the firewall instead of the wheel well.

Also shown in this photo is the right Innovative mount. Pay special attention to the plug, which looks like a O2 sensor plug (because it is.) I had a spare O2 plug (male & female) so I made a patch for my LC-1 WBO2's power and ground. Now the LC-1 is no longer hard wired into my engine harness. Well actually it is, but only up to a certain point. I did this to allow replacement of the LC-1 if necessary. The power is drawn from the 1ZZ Harness' upper left O2 sensor(unused in a 2ZZ application.)

8. I used the same nutsert technique to mount my OBX 5 port vacuum manifold. I cut some aluminum angle bar for the actual mount, which was placed just to the left of forward engine mount. The feed for the manifold traces the same path from the IM as the throttle cable, which you can see run underneath the mount. The large hose barbs will be replaced with properly sized ones for the various size vacuum hoses (3/16, 5/16, and 1/4.)


9. Now onto the engine. Here you can see both new and old together:


10. I mentioned I was going to be installing Piper Cams Stage II (from JNZ) and here's it in the process:

I used the procedure outlined in the Toyota Celica TSB for lift bolt removal. It shows the easiest way or removing and installing cams that I've found. The timing chain is held in place with some safety wire.

And speaking of lift bolts. This engine had the older style blunt bolts. You can see them in comparison to the newer "silver" bolts on the right:


Probably the most overlooked step during cam installation is the VVT unlock procedure. It's fairly easy, but will require an air compressor. You can read about it here: http://www.newcelica.org/forums/showthread.php?t=299052&highlight=VVT+cam+unlock I was one of the folks who forgot the step and had to take the cam back out. Sure enough, it was torqued in the locked position (basically eliminating VVT.)


When you are buttoning everything back up, also don't forget to lock the chain tensioner in the compressed position as pictured below. When you turn the crank counter-clockwise it will expand and take the slack out.


11. The all so crucial valve shim adjustment is next. This step is what delayed me the most. Come to find out that these shims are generally not stocked, and many are on back order. You must follow the updated BGB procedure, as there have been changes. There are also some handy guides on NC.org that cover some of the tricks. A nice tool to have is the Toyota SST which allows you to remove shims while leaving the cams in place.


To help keep things organized, I simply drilled a bunch of holes into a 2x4, each marked accordingly. The long needle noses also came in handy to fish out dropped shims.


To measure the thickness of the shims I used a micrometer. In order to do this I used a small bolt to fit down inside the cup of the shim. The digital micrometer allowed me to set a floating zero, so that all subsiquent measurements were of just the shim's thickness. If your shims aren't too old, you should be able to still read the number printed on the sides. My old engine had ~60k miles on it, and I could still clearly read theses markings. You should still verify their thickness so that you get the right replacements.


continued on next post...
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
12. Moving on to the transmission. After a bit of research and the help of Curt I decided to go with the European MR2 Spyder 6-speed with standard helical LSD. Since it is from a Spyder, all the linkage bolts up. It also already has the reverse block-out.

Here are the gear ratios:
Ratios:
1st: 3.166
2nd: 1.904
3rd: 1.310
4th: 0.969
5th: 0.815
6th: 0.725
Final Drive: 3.941

13. Before I could the transmission on, I needed to swap over the Fidanza lightweight flywheel and ACT HD SS clutch. Both had less than 50 miles on them, not even broken in. I used new Toyota FW bolts this time instead of the ARP bolts, which no one could seem to decide on a torque value for. You can see the small red dots to measure that last quarter turn off of and the torque order written by the bolts:


And the ACT clutch mounted:


14. Since the Rotrex takes up the space previously occupied by the AC compressor, a special mount built by Corky is used to mount the compressor to the hot side. This is the first of its kind, because unlike before it is adjustable:


15. Now for the fueling. While a return setup is not necessary, I wanted to go the extra mile. So I ordered a billet rail from Smaay over at NewCelica.org. This would allow me to have a center feed, with two outlets on either end. It also has provisions for two 1/8" NPT sending units. I also wanted to maintain the benefits of a fuel damper, like the stock rail. I used a Marren EFI fuel damper mounted on the driver's side of the rail.

In this photo you can see the damper (red) and the pigtails of the 700cc MWR injectors. The feed port is a 1/4" NPT 90 degree to -6AN. All fittings are Earl's Ano-tough Swivel Seal. You can also see how I had to run the wiring harness. I removed all the OEM electrical tape and loom completely from the entire harness to run my additional items and clean everything up.

16. To ensure I would have no leaks, all the AN lines and fittings were pressure checked using a Summit kit. I pressurized the rail to 50 psi and all the lines to 100 psi, which were submerged in water. I only had to re-do one line, and hopefully everything holds. In the following picture you can see the feed and return line. Please do not copy the return line. That 90 degree -6AN hose end will not fit between the crankcase vent and firewall, I'll be changing that.


17. For the feed side I connected directly to the OE 5/16" hard line. I used an Earl's crush collar -6AN fitting for this, followed by more Ano-tough -6AN hose ends and stainless braided hose.

If you look closely below that relay box you can see the boost gauge sending unit. I failed to get pictures, but both it and the oil temp sender's lines run parallel with the shift cables up to the cubby. If you pull out the large rubber insulator around the shift cables, there is a small area you can cut out in order to run wires. This is a much more direct shot than going through the wire harness holes on the left and right.

18. On the pump side I used an Earl's 90 degree bulkhead fitting connected to a straight hose end.

I failed to get photos of the lines to the Aeromotive Compact EFI Adjustable Fuel Pressure Regulator, but it is mounted next to the passenger side engine lid hinge. All the stainless lines are held secure using rubber isolated hose clasps bolted to nutserts.

19. Here's a shot showing the belt's path:


20. As for the hose routing, it's pretty straightforward... but there's only so much you can do with the engine out of the car. Inevitably there will be interference issues. So I got everything as close to complete as reasonable before installing. Here you can see the basic layout:

Please note that the coolant hoses will need tweaking, and a few of the T-bolt clamps had to be rotated for clearance purposes. I also machined down my Rotrex's outlet neck to allow more clearance. Before it was machined, the first 90 degree bend was pressed into the bottom of the alternator (not a huge issue.) Now it doesn't touch at all. Also note the Turbo Supra MAF which has been shortened by Web3.0 for more clearance for the IC.

In case you were wondering, the BOV is actually a recirculate valve. Heater hose runs from the BOV's exhaust to this fitting on the intake side of the Rotrex:

This should be a considerably quiet FI car.

21. And just for sh!ts and giggles.

Before anyone goes off on me about being a Lotus wanabe; I'll be sanding that down. Hopefully it turns out well, I've got some ideas for it. The valve cover was finished in wrinkle black powder coat by JNZ Finishing and the valve cover was bolted down using some stainless allen head bolts from McMaster with black anodized washers from Serina.

22. Back in the engine goes. This is the third method I've used to remove/install an engine, and it's not quite there. I really needed a better wooden stand for the engine, and that motorcycle lift really could have used casters on all four corners.



Lots more to come... But I'll be taking a short break to ready a truck for sale.
 

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This will be fun to read, I like your paint booth wish I had one.
 

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Wow! Props on the attention to detail...that engine bay may be cleaner than when it rolled off the assembly line! I think you are the guy we all want to buy a used car from. I'll look forward to the next chapter.
 

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Man, you have to much time on your hands. If you have any extra I would love to see you do this to my turbo setup!
 

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Fantastic work thus far Chad. Can't wait to see the engine back in the bay. I love the very stealth look you have given the engine.
 

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Props to you Sammy, I love reading about your projects
 

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I really like your work. Wekk done !
Glad to see the recirculating BOV :)

Will you be running your crankvent up stream before the Rotrex with the catch can in between, or like others have done and just used check valves ? and vent in the engine bay
 

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I really like your work. Well done !
Glad to see the recirculating BOV :)

Will you be running your crankvent up stream before the Rotrex with the catch can in between, or like others have done and just used check valves ? and vent in the engine bay

Wish Toyota had deleated the boot in the SW20 then they could have made a N/S facing engine layout like a Ferrari !
 

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Road trip to North Florida for you when you finish this beast Sammy. I need the final shove over the cliff and a ride in your car will do it for me. (My wallet considers you,Curt, and grumpy the anti-christ) One word of caution on the nutserts, I would use anti-seize when installing the bolts if the hardware is not all stainless. I use them on my boat projects and if the threads corrode up at all the nut seat slips when removing and starts turning in the hole. Major pain getting them out after that, jusk ask me how I know. Probably won't be a problem for years on a car but you just never know.
Nice project motor, really nice.
 

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I definitely enjoy reading your threads. Thanks for all the pics. Good luck on finishing everything up, looks amazing so far!
 

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Everything looks really good!
 

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Nice work Sammy... this thread should be re-named "How to do it right..." ;) not many people (outside of racing and aircraft) pay that sort of attention to detail.

In the event the engine has to come out a time or two, not unusual for projects like this, you will really thank yourself for going through the extra BS of fiting all the AN hoses and fittings, and pre-pressure testing them to save another headache... again, nice job (and welcome back home)
 

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This was a fun read you should be very happy with the work you've done it looks great.

-Spargo
 

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Looks like a very good build, that motor should have a nice powerband. I do enjoy how you build your cars, very organized.
 

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I like everything you have done and especially the color of the valve cover. You are meticulous and exact like a textbook.

I am happy to see the bushing tool worked great for you and If it is not too much trouble could I use the above picture.
 
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