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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been practicing wrapping car parts with a huge roll of gloss black that I found on ebay for like $30 a few months ago. Failed miserably with interior parts but I'm not too bad at the big exterior panels. So maybe now it's time for a full vehicle wrap. I think flat will help hide all the dents and dings in the 15 year old body but what color :color_:

The current body color is Solar Yellow with overspray in quite a few places that will need to be fixed during the application. What do you guys think about a matte yellow chrome or Matte Canyon Copper Chrome?

Show me pics of wrapped MR's please!

Edit: The best I have found so far. I think it looks fantastic!!!
https://www.flickr.com/photos/monsterwraps/30082886774/in/photostream/
 

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This is just an opinion and an honest answer so take it for what it is (even if you disagree):
-Unless you know what you’re doing and can make all of the vinyl lie flat and have no ripples (and very importantly, have the underlying paint work really nice and smooth, otherwise you’ll see it all through the vinyl, which may actually look worse than doing nothing and leaving it as is), I personally would have a professional (and no demerits to your skills as I don’t know what they are) do the work. It will be expensive for a pro to do it...that said, if your Spyder is a car you plan to keep and appreciate for the long haul, I’d go with paint (yup, totally different direction in this thread).

Not a vinyl fan, and I think paint is a much better way to go, even if more expensive. If you’re going to do it, do it right and not half way.

Again, just one (of many) opinions.
 

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Mr2 Spyder is relatively easy to wrap so long as you know what to do in single piece and what to do in multi-piece. The rear can be split into 2 or more pieces if you are worried about it. Dents will always show through the wrap unless you use body filler. Peeling clearcoat is the same. The only way to get a beautiful wrap is to either start with a flawless car or have all dents and imperfections worked out. Keep a heat gun handy and buy some GOOD material, most cheap wraps do not last long and are a nightmare to work with when going on edges. I would assume you know the basics of wrapping, so take your time with it and make sure you do things right, even if it means taking fenders and panels off to tuck the material correctly.

Edit: The best color is what appeals to your eyes and you could live with. I would go with the same color as my car as I don't like my door jambs being red while the exterior would be some other color...

Chrome wraps are difficult as many of them require steam or else the finish will be off...
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
So I had my first true success on a curved body panel tonight. I wrapped the ML 500 rear pillars on the family SUV. Came out pretty good. Not perfect but good enough you would think they are painted at 5 ft away. I also figured I should try a windshield frame and some mirrors as I understand the odd shapes are some of the hardest. The windshield was going ok until I tore a little section while heating. Anyway, take a look at the before and after. I'm going to try to wrap the bumper, maybe a corner next to see if I can get it right.

As far as bringing it to a professional. I want to do everything myself. Did the swap myself. The engine management. The seat covers, fuel pump, injectors, brakes etc... The car was $900 originally so I have a hard time spending a grand or two to have it wrapped. If I spent that much on material I could probably learn to do this really well.

Thanks for the pointers on the chrome colors. Ill try to shy away from those. I am having trouble not scratching the gloss black too so flats are going to be my friend at first.

How do you guys determine where/how to do two pieces?



 

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So I had my first true success on a curved body panel tonight. I wrapped the ML 500 rear pillars on the family SUV. Came out pretty good. Not perfect but good enough you would think they are painted at 5 ft away. I also figured I should try a windshield frame and some mirrors as I understand the odd shapes are some of the hardest. The windshield was going ok until I tore a little section while heating. Anyway, take a look at the before and after. I'm going to try to wrap the bumper, maybe a corner next to see if I can get it right.

As far as bringing it to a professional. I want to do everything myself. Did the swap myself. The engine management. The seat covers, fuel pump, injectors, brakes etc... The car was $900 originally so I have a hard time spending a grand or two to have it wrapped. If I spent that much on material I could probably learn to do this really well.

Thanks for the pointers on the chrome colors. Ill try to shy away from those. I am having trouble not scratching the gloss black too so flats are going to be my friend at first.

How do you guys determine where/how to do two pieces?




Nice! The general idea is you want to try and wrap in one piece almost everything if you have the ability to. VVivid wrap is known to be some of the best stuff in terms of flexibility. I've seen many people wrap the rear in a single piece of VVivid, 3m, and Avery Denison wrap. Most people tend to wrap general areas with one piece while doing inlays separately. Some choose to do multi piece laying when it comes to complex angles to ensure longevity of the wrap and that it will not come off through time. Fenders, Hood, Doors, Quarters, and Engine Lid should be fine as one piece because they aren't really complex angles. Keep in mind that stretching wrap can also result in discoloration of the vinyl if overstretched. Make sure you understand your material well! Bumpers are your choice for wrapping in either one piece or multi piece. Make sure you watch how to tuck corners on all the panels, they are prime spots for failure!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks!

Seeing things in the light of the day (literally) has told me that I still have a little more learning to do. A few bubbles / fingers appeared where I did not apply enough stretch to the film. Getting a flat clean section to stay that way overnight is harder than expected. I think I am finally starting to understand the use of heat. They don't explain that really well in the YouTube videos.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Black windshield frame looks great. The yellow frame sticks out like a sore thumb.
Thanks! It's going to take at least 1 more try to get it perfect. Getting the film under the rubber between the glass and the frame is a bit of a challenge. I'm very glad I bought a tool set for this.
 

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Back in the bean business I used to apply the vinyl signs on our vehicles myself. If you can do anything correctly and have the right conditions and understand the process it’s way easier than painting. A warm 90f + indoor relitively dust free environment is key. Steady patient hands both you and your helper are key in my opinion. Yes smooth but you don’t need to be so concerned with micro scratches is with paint. But clean, clean clean is vital as well. Lots of release solution. Proper squeegee and yes a sharp needle. Is was taught (by a pro who did it for monster trucks) if you ran into a bubble prick the pricked thing. Goo-goo should squirt out rather than air. I air comes out you be not qualified to do the release application. Hated doing the pin prick thing but it worked. Big truck rivets are a real challenge the make a round, about nickel size, stiff bristle brush for the tuff spots...
How much for materials to cover a Spyder these days? My clear coat is ghetto.
 

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Back in the bean business I used to apply the vinyl signs on our vehicles myself. If you can do anything correctly and have the right conditions and understand the process it’s way easier than painting. A warm 90f + indoor relitively dust free environment is key. Steady patient hands both you and your helper are key in my opinion. Yes smooth but you don’t need to be so concerned with micro scratches is with paint. But clean, clean clean is vital as well. Lots of release solution. Proper squeegee and yes a sharp needle. Is was taught (by a pro who did it for monster trucks) if you ran into a bubble prick the pricked thing. Goo-goo should squirt out rather than air. I air comes out you be not qualified to do the release application. Hated doing the pin prick thing but it worked. Big truck rivets are a real challenge the make a round, about nickel size, stiff bristle brush for the tuff spots...
How much for materials to cover a Spyder these days? My clear coat is ghetto.
Expect to pay around $400-$600 for the materials. Clearcoat needs a ton of wet sanding if it's going bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wrapped by myself, cost me $260 in material.

View attachment 63554 View attachment 63562
For the colors and quality of film I want that is not too far off. How long did it take you. I figured I would do mine one panel at a time over a couple weeks. Also, what did you do about the door jam, fender gaps etc? Was it a black car to start with?


BTW you have a lot of leaves in your exhaust!
 

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For the colors and quality of film I want that is not too far off. How long did it take you. I figured I would do mine one panel at a time over a couple weeks. Also, what did you do about the door jam, fender gaps etc? Was it a black car to start with?


BTW you have a lot of leaves in your exhaust!

Here is a timelapse video of the wrap process, it took me 1 full day, including filling dents with bondo and sanding/prepping, and finished it off on 3 different night after work. could have probably done it in 2 full days.
https://youtu.be/CK6a5I5uRMk

feel free to check out my other video on my youtube channel, i have other diy custom stuff going on there.

Thank you,
 

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For the colors and quality of film I want that is not too far off. How long did it take you. I figured I would do mine one panel at a time over a couple weeks. Also, what did you do about the door jam, fender gaps etc? Was it a black car to start with?


BTW you have a lot of leaves in your exhaust!

Here is a timelapse video of the wrap process, it took me 1 full day, including filling dents with bondo and sanding/prepping, and finished it off on 3 different night after work. could have probably done it in 2 full days. Car was red before, Jams were painted in similar color grey, altho i could have wrapped the jam too. Door and other gaps u can tuck it in and get it to wrap around enough to not show original color underneath, otherwise taking off panels would be needed.
https://youtu.be/CK6a5I5uRMk

feel free to check out my other video on my youtube channel, i have other diy custom stuff going on there.

Thank you,
 

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A tip for the front bumper - with paint my front bumper was getting destroyed by stone chips. I paid a pro to wrap the front bumper only with black gloss wrap. The wrap has been fantastic with zero chips or tears! Even better than the paint/clear bra that I tried in the past.
 
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