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Discussion Starter #1
Battery is dead. Regular batteries don't last long in AZ, plus I don't drive the car much. (side note: yes, I need to get a battery disconnector if I don't drive it much)

I looked up Optima. They used to sell Red for the Spyder, but then they discontinued them. Now Optima is saying the Yellow top is for the Spyder. Is this true?

Sears used to have an Optima type Diehard the last time I bought my battery. I looked online and didn't see this listed. (actually didn't see much, the Sears online site sucks and you can't find anything)

My question is: Do you have a Optima Red or Yellow, or Sears Diehard (optima)? How do you like it? What size is it?

Thanks.
 

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Optima batteries are not that great. Look into getting a Deka AGM battery as you can disconnect them and they will hold it's capacity for many months.
 

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optima

Local battery shop use to sell optima battries but stopped due to having many issues with them. They won't even special order one if requested.
 

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LOVED the Optima redtop on my '86 MR2.

Equally impressed with the yellowtop in my '05. The spyder size is smaller and has less capacity than my old car, but I can still run my stereo/fan for 5+ hours while working on the car. Interestingly, my radio/amplifier will start cutting out (battery is basically dead), but the yellow top will still start my car.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Optima batteries are not that great. Look into getting a Deka AGM battery as you can disconnect them and they will hold it's capacity for many months.
Thanks, Dev. Glad to see your still around here. Can you recharge these batteries? Do you know what the part number is? I did a search at Deka and they just show the regular battery, not the AGM.
 

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Thanks, Dev. Glad to see your still around here. Can you recharge these batteries? Do you know what the part number is? I did a search at Deka and they just show the regular battery, not the AGM.
I'm not sure but I believe Deka only makes AGM batteries. If I were you I would go with their 13LB battery and free up some weight on the rear end. You can recharge these batteries however once they are charged you should not trickle charge them because you don't need to as they hold their capacitance for months and you may shorten their life.
 

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I'm not sure but I believe Deka only makes AGM batteries. If I were you I would go with their 13LB battery and free up some weight on the rear end. You can recharge these batteries however once they are charged you should not trickle charge them because you don't need to as they hold their capacitance for months and you may shorten their life.
I'm going with Deka again. I tried their etx9 (6 lb) in my Spyder when I was using it on the street. It lasted a few weeks due to user negligence. I think I let the car sit without being driven for about a week or two, terminals plugged it, and it died on me, never accepted a charge after that. Then I moved back to an Odyssey PC545 (10lb) and it went for a while until I allowed it to loose charge too many times, It eventually died when I began using the Spyder as a track-only car. That's my fault, and i consider the 10lb AGM battery to be perfect for a street driven Spyder that's regularly driven.

I don't know why, but that PC545 was holding less and less charge up to the moment it died. I suppose the act of using the battery once a month to start the car, followed by an hour of overcharging by spinning the alternator at redline, may have killed it. Know anything about racing and AGM batteries dev? Do alternators always charge, or only when the battery drops below full charge?

I'm trying the Deka 6 lb again because I think that if I take better care of it then it should meet my needs of starting the car 25 times a year, and being as light as possible while its just sitting there. i intend to remove it after returning home, charging it to capacity then leaving it in my closet until next race day.
 

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I'm going with Deka again. I tried their etx9 (6 lb) in my Spyder when I was using it on the street. It lasted a few weeks due to user negligence. I think I let the car sit without being driven for about a week or two, terminals plugged it, and it died on me, never accepted a charge after that. Then I moved back to an Odyssey PC545 (10lb) and it went for a while until I allowed it to loose charge too many times, It eventually died when I began using the Spyder as a track-only car. That's my fault, and i consider the 10lb AGM battery to be perfect for a street driven Spyder that's regularly driven.

I don't know why, but that PC545 was holding less and less charge up to the moment it died. I suppose the act of using the battery once a month to start the car, followed by an hour of overcharging by spinning the alternator at redline, may have killed it. Know anything about racing and AGM batteries dev? Do alternators always charge, or only when the battery drops below full charge?

I'm trying the Deka 6 lb again because I think that if I take better care of it then it should meet my needs of starting the car 25 times a year, and being as light as possible while its just sitting there. i intend to remove it after returning home, charging it to capacity then leaving it in my closet until next race day.
The thing about the Deka batteries you have to keep in mind that they do take a beating however one should not expect five years out of them, more like two or three. The cool thing is the weight savings and the fact that the Deka batteries are so cheap that it works out very well.

In regard to your question the alternator along with the battery are in a complementary state where when the battery has been sitting the voltage regulator will ramp up and charge the battery as well as what ever load is on the car. When equilibrium is meet the voltage regulator will stabilize voltage thus not over charging the battery.
The battery is very key in that it's a temporary buffer during transient drops that are too fast for the voltage regulator to catch up and it also acts as a filter in regard to voltage spikes.

A big battery will perform these tasks better then a small deka but then who here has power seats and all of that other crap.
 

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The thing about the Deka batteries you have to keep in mind that they do take a beating however one should not expect five years out of them, more like two or three. The cool thing is the weight savings and the fact that the Deka batteries are so cheap that it works out very well.

In regard to your question the alternator along with the battery are in a complementary state where when the battery has been sitting the voltage regulator will ramp up and charge the battery as well as what ever load is on the car. When equilibrium is meet the voltage regulator will stabilize voltage thus not over charging the battery.
The battery is very key in that it's a temporary buffer during transient drops that are too fast for the voltage regulator to catch up and it also acts as a filter in regard to voltage spikes.

A big battery will perform these tasks better then a small deka but then who here has power seats and all of that other crap.
*Looks in the direction of the z3 owners*
Stripped out as it is, I don't think voltage spikes are too big an issue. Maybe if I install brighter lights for night racing....
 

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As I understand it, the Spyders sold new in the U.S. had Panasonic batteries in them, but Panasonic replacement batteries are not available in the U.S.A. Why is that?

I replaced my original battery after (... what? ...) 7 or 8 years.
Not because it failed; but because I couldn't believe a battery could last that long.
Is that why Panasonic batteries aren't available? Because they last too long?
After all, something that doesn't break is bad for The Economy.
(Rule-of-Thumb: Good_for_Consumer = Bad_for_Economy)
Panasonic batteries on the whole are some of the best ever made. Toyota owns a good deal of Panasonic.

You might remember some of your electronics come with Panasonic batteries for the remote control that seem to last for years.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I am a diehard gold guy. Sure its a full size battery BUT there is a sears everywhere they are 3 years full replacement and a good prorate afterwards.

When I was in TX the heat would kill our batteries in about 2.5 years. Got new golds every time no questions and that is something that has stuck with me.

Huh, say what? When was the last time you bought a Diehard Gold T-Bone? I bought one 5 years ago...well, 4.3. I looked online and the only battery Sears has for our car is the regular Diehard. I couldn't believe it and went in. Sure enough, the only 51R they have is the regular Diehard. Check out TX and let me know. Be interesting to see TX has it, but AZ doesn't.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Current thoughts:
Guess there's Yellow Optima around $180.
No Diehard Gold, only Diehard with 1 1/2 year warranty.
Deka website only shows no maintenance 5 or 6 year battery. Not available in Tucson. There is a Rayovac battery from Batteries Plus that looks just like the Deka but I think it's one of the 1 year warranty ones.
Exide website shows Classic, Extreme, or AGM. Supposedly I can get them from a repair shop in Tucson. Don't know cost, need to check.

I'm thinking if the Exide AGM is available for $180 I'll get that. Your thoughts anyone? Has anyone had an Exide?

Final note: Went to a local auto shop for the Exide. He said he didn't have any but could get me the Deka. I asked if it was the AGM, he said yes. Picked it up today and it's not the AGM. I don't think Deka makes a 51R AGM anymore. (or if they ever did). Bought the maintenace free Deka because it's the only 5 year battery in town. Cost $118.
 
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