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So I wasn't quite sure where to put this thread, but I've been looking around on the forum trying to find why Toyota started offering the staggered width and height set-up (15x6 Front, 16x7 Rear) instead of sticking with the staggered width setup they had before (15x6 Front, 15x6.5 Rear).

Are there any handling loses going back to the 15" all around set-up? Is there any performance advantages with the staggered set-up that is on the 03+MR-S
 

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generally speaking, and i am sure others will agree, and others will contradict this, however smaller wheels will aid in acceleration. Likewise, larger diameter wheels will mean slightly slower acceleration, however increased top speed, that is if the vehicle has enough power to support it. wider tires are debatable.. around here somewhere there is a thread on wheel width and tread touching the pavement.. just because you have wider wheels does not mean you will get better grip. i am unfamiliar with the reasoning behind Toyotas decision to increase the diameter of the rear wheels, maybe a more aggressive stance, maybe more tires available for a larger rim (i know the selection was limited when i went to my local auto shops for new rear tires), perhaps something more scientific. someone else can fill in the blanks with the scientific mumbo jumbo.

Personally my preface lift 02 with minimal footwork upgrades handles great on the 15x6 and 15x6.5 wheels.
 

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It is not unusual for an automaker to change some of the design elements on a midlife cycle of any car.
They do this to keep the car fresh and incorporated some of the design elements that were not implemented on the first go around.

As far as performance it's hard to say and subjectively I did not notice any difference however technically speaking you are more likely to be hurt by the heavy 16 inch wheels then the 15 in terms of added un-sprung weight and acceleration.
 

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How about the mpg?
Technically MPG will suffer as a result of weight and more rubber especially unsprung weight but not enough to notice in the real world. You choose your wheels and tires to reflect the kind of driving you are going to do and what works for an autox set up does not necessarily translate on a street set up where the goal is to have fun and enjoy the car.

To often we get so caught up in our our hobbies and we take them to extreme levels of purchasing more expensive marketed crap that does nothing but hider the fun but I digress.

Give me a bone stock Spyder with a Corkey breast plate and it will be all the fun I need.
 

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It was my understanding that the 16" rear wheel allowed for a lower profile tire which increases sidewall stiffness without affecting overall diameter. This gives the car better stability in corners, especially with the increased rear weight bias of a mid engined car.

I could be totally wrong.
 

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It was my understanding that the 16" rear wheel allowed for a lower profile tire which increases sidewall stiffness without affecting overall diameter. This gives the car better stability in corners, especially with the increased rear weight bias of a mid engined car.

I could be totally wrong.
Plus sizing can be attributed to better sidewall stiffness but it does not necessarily mean better handling.
It really depends on the overall stiffness of the tire. For me I preferred a little more sidewall because it gives you plenty of warning to let you know where the limits are and for me this translates into better handling though confidence. A stiffer sidewall like what I have now does give you less deflection but also lets go abruptly. Much of the confidence inspiring aspects is actually attributed to the quality of the tires and you get what you pay for.
Plus sizing generally speaking is relegated for those that want large wheels for looks these days.
The real reason you want large wheels is to fit big brakes so it's a trade off that may yield an advantage in racing .
 

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It is not unusual for an automaker to change some of the design elements on a midlife cycle of any car.
They do this to keep the car fresh and incorporated some of the design elements that were not implemented on the first go around.

As far as performance it's hard to say and subjectively I did not notice any difference however technically speaking you are more likely to be hurt by the heavy 16 inch wheels then the 15 in terms of added un-sprung weight and acceleration.
I believe that the total wheel/tire diameter is still the same, front and back. It give you a wider tire, with more area touching the road.
 

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generally speaking, and i am sure others will agree, and others will contradict this, however smaller wheels will aid in acceleration. Likewise, larger diameter wheels will mean slightly slower acceleration, however increased top speed, that is if the vehicle has enough power to support it. wider tires are debatable.. around here somewhere there is a thread on wheel width and tread touching the pavement.. just because you have wider wheels does not mean you will get better grip. i am unfamiliar with the reasoning behind Toyotas decision to increase the diameter of the rear wheels, maybe a more aggressive stance, maybe more tires available for a larger rim (i know the selection was limited when i went to my local auto shops for new rear tires), perhaps something more scientific. someone else can fill in the blanks with the scientific mumbo jumbo.

Personally my preface lift 02 with minimal footwork upgrades handles great on the 15x6 and 15x6.5 wheels.
In terms of acceleration and top speed, you are confusing wheel diameter with tire diameter.
There is no difference in tire diameter on any of the Spyders sold. It's the same.
 

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generally speaking, and i am sure others will agree, and others will contradict this, however smaller wheels will aid in acceleration. Likewise, larger diameter wheels will mean slightly slower acceleration, however increased top speed, that is if the vehicle has enough power to support it. wider tires are debatable.. around here somewhere there is a thread on wheel width and tread touching the pavement.. just because you have wider wheels does not mean you will get better grip. i am unfamiliar with the reasoning behind Toyotas decision to increase the diameter of the rear wheels, maybe a more aggressive stance, maybe more tires available for a larger rim (i know the selection was limited when i went to my local auto shops for new rear tires), perhaps something more scientific. someone else can fill in the blanks with the scientific mumbo jumbo.

Personally my preface lift 02 with minimal footwork upgrades handles great on the 15x6 and 15x6.5 wheels.
I have no idea why the idea that wider tires don't provide more grip makes sense to anyone. It's ludicrous. Anyone who thinks a car will have the same skid pad numbers with a 195mm tire vs. something like a 275mm tire (both have optimum rim width) is crazy.

Toyota went to 16's in the rear because it looks better. The general public believes sports cars look better with larger and wider wheels in the rear. Look at every sports car in the world.
 
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